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THE 



UNIVERSITY 
OF ILLINOIS 
LIBRARY 



Nl 
19 

















^M[^jCS|; 








MWsmroFiLUNisLiMuar 




Published by 

c Ohe Classes of 1918 - 1919 



VOLUME IV 

State Normal and Industrial School 

Nineteen Hundred and Ei&hteen 
Ellendale, North Dakota 



leiricattDit 








a the bags, ante students af 
the State Normal an& Snfrus- 
trial Schaal, uiho haue gone 
nut ta fight far us "sameuihere in 
JFrance" in the great cause uf humanity, 
uie, the classes uf 1918 anfr 1919, grate- 
fully bebicate this baak. 




c 



S'NI TCH ER 




P. Rehberg 




'T£>£ #0/5 Friend' 



o.v.o39 



PAGE 3 








State Board of Regents 




Hon. Lewis F. Crawford, A. B., /'resident 
Sentinel Butte 



Hon. Robert T. Muir, A. B Sarles 

Hon. George A. Totten Bowman 

Hon. J. D. Taylor, M. D Grand Forks 

Hon. Charles E. Vermilya, A. M., S. T. B, 
Bismarck 



Charles Liessman, Secretary to the Board 
Bismarck 




PAGE 4 



c a t / 




^es 









iU 




PAGE 5 




rrr\ rTT^^Sh . /v^rT^ N.iv^ 



'N'I'T'C'H -E'R 





Ryland M. Black, A. B., A. M. 

President 



PAGE 6 




rrrs r^r^^Sh, /ft^rTn^ or?/-? 

NITC HER 





Carrie Tuttle, A. B. 

(Tut) 

Librarian 

Wittenberg College 

Library Economy, Chicago U. 

S. N. I. S. 1907 



E. W. Ackert, B. Pd., A. B. 

(Dad) 

Mathematics 

Steinman College 

Drake University 

S. N. I. S. 1907 





Gabriella C. Brendemuhl, A. B. 

(Brendy) 

German and English 

Carlton College 

S. N. I. S. iqio 



PAGE 




Snitch er 





Jennie J. Harnsberger 

(Jennie) 

Fine Arts, Drawing 

Normal Course, Art Institute, Chicago 

Student Handicraft Guild, Minneapolis 

Art Student, Chicago 

S. N. I. S. 1914 




Floyd C. Hathaway, B. S. 

(Hindi) 

Agriculture 

So. Dak. State College of Agriculture 

and Mechanical Arts 

University of Wisconsin 

S. N. I. S. 1913 




Olin E. Combeli.ick, B. S. 

(Ole) 

Director of Normal Department 

Dakota Wesleyan University 

S. N. I. S. 1913 



PAGE X 




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saOHs^ rw-a 



S' NITCH ER 







Jessie Howell Dunphy 

(Jess) 

Piano 

St. Mary's Hall 

Cosmopolitan School of Music 

Student in Berlin, Germany 

S. N. I. S. 1 909- 1 i ; 1 9 1 4 




Fanny C. Crawford, M. Accts. 

(Fan) 

Secretary to President 

Registrar 

S. N. I. S. 1914 



■HEB IBs * 





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L. B. Fields, E. E. 

(Tub) 

Director of Mechanic Arts 

Purdue University 
S. N. I. S. 1910-12; 191 5 




page 9 




S'NITCHER 





Tilda R. Natwick 

(Tildy) 

Home Economics 

Valley City Normal School 

Stevens Foint Normal School, Wis. 

Stout Institute 

S. N. I. S. 191 5 




[AMES T. I'ULI.I.K, li. A 

(Jeb) 

Latin and Phychology 
Carleton College 
S. N. I. S. 1915 




Herbert Brown 

(Herbie) 

History and Education 

Dakota Wesleyan University 

University of South Dakota 

S. N. I. S. 1915 



PAGE 10 




^-^ ^y^^Ov 



Sni tch er 



Lulu Potts, A. B. 

(Lulu) 

Physical Education for Women 

Simpson College 

Normal School of Physical Education 

Battle Creek, Mich. 

S. N. I. S. iqi6 





Ralph L. Campbell, A. B. 

(Fat) 

Physical Science 

Central State Normal School 

State University 

Civil Engineering Course of the I. C. S. 

S. N. I. S. 1917 



LlLLIACE LORENE MONTGOMERY, Ph. B. 

(Monty) 

English and Public Speaking 

Chicago Musical College 

University of Chicago 

S. N. I. S. 1917 




TAGE 11 




S'NITCHE R 





Edith L. Johns 

(Johnny) 

Commercial Arts 

Washburn College, Topeka, Kansas 

Gem City Business College, Quincy, III. 

Spaldings' Business College, Kansas City, M< 

S. N. I. S. 1917 



0. E. Anderson, B. S. 

(Pete) 

Athletic Director and Coach 

State Normal School, Valley City, N. Dak. 

Carroll College, Waukesha, Wis. 

Highland Park College, Des Moines, la. 

S. N. I. S. 1917 





L. Maude Finley 

(Just Finley) 

Domestic Art 

State Normal School, Pittsburg, Kansas 

Summer School, University of Colorado 

Teachers' College, Columbia University 

S. N. I. S. 1917 



PAGE 1' 




rrr\ r-'rrl^Sfo. 



NITCHER 



.<- „~J-^: 



-^^ 




Marjorie Aileen Keck, A. B. 

(Marjy) 

Voice 

Illinois Wesleyan University 

University of Illinois 

Cosmopolitan School of Music 

Wesleyan College of Music 

Rupert Neely Studios, New York 

S. X. I. S. i q i 7 




Mrs. Drum 

(Ma) 

Matron 

S. N. I. S. 1917 



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1 



Robert L. Ashley 

(Robbie) 

Assistant in Mechanic Arts 

Hackley Manual Training' School 

Muskegon, Mich. 

State Normal and Industrial School 

Aberdeen, S. Dak. 

State Normal and Industrial School 

Ellendale. N. D. 

S. X. I. S. 1917 




PAGE 13 




S nitch er 





J. S. Dawson 

(Jake) 

Asst. in Agriculture 

S. N. I. S. 1917 




I lorence Marsh 

( Flossie) 

Critic and Rural School Demonstrator 

Normal School, Stevens Point, Wis. 

University of Wisconsin 

S. N. I. S. 1917 




Ruth Haas 

(Ruth) 

Asst. in Music Department 

S. N. I. S. 1 9 1 7 



PAGE M 




Sni tcher 





PAGE 15 




tip. r\"i-r." Qzl dzZati , > rrrj 



Snitch 



E R 




VhflOR 



ffoLL 




AM MM I\ SERVICE 

'08 Relse Walker, U. S. a. 
'09 I'M ward Porter, U. S. A. 
Ki Howard Barnes, U. S. A. 
(Hyde McCormick, U. S. A. 

I ,c;i nder K inn', I '• S. A. 
11 Howard Let son, I'. S. A. 

Leifth Porter-, It. F. < '. 
'12 John Laemnle, U. S. A. 

Dan McDonald, 1'. S. A. 

Thomas McDonald, P. S. A. 

George Misfeldt, IT. S. A, 

Glenn Morrison, Civilian 
Service 

Howard Morrison, P. S. A. 

Albert Shimmin, IT. S. A. 

Lorenzo ZiegJer. U, S. A. 
'13 Clell Bentley, P. S. A. 

Joseph Boyd, U. S. A. 

Joe Bentley, IT. S. A. 

Lyall Willis, IT. S. A. 
'14 Lloyd Myers, F. S. A. 
'15 Frank Callan, U. S. A. 

Joe Carpenter, U. S. A. 

John Da we, U. S. A. 

William Gamble, IT. S. A. 

Jay Harm, U. S. A. 

Emmett McGraw. IT. S. A 

Hector Porter, U. S. A. 

Francis Abraham, U. S. A. 
'16 Floyd Brown, I T . S. A. 

Stanley Fleming, U. S. A. 

Roy Oertli, U. S. A. 

Charles Peek, U S. N. 

Walter Saunders, U. s. A. 

Arthur Strutz, U. S. A. 

Fred Thompson, P. S. A. 

Everett Thrams. U S. N. 

Eber Welcher, P. S. A. 

Leonard Meachen, P. S. A. 
'17 Fred Ackerman. P. S. A. 

Leslie Casbon. P. S. A. 

Thomas Lee, U. S. A 

Fred Walz, IT. S. A. 
'18 Emil Bjur, Civilian Service 

TEACHERS I IV SERVICE 
Ex-Pres. W. E. Hicks, Y. M. C. 

A. 
Robert Pearson. P. S. A. 
C. C. Hale, P. S. A. 
Louis P. Cook, Civilian Service 




PAGE Pi 




gszte ssrZ^ ^Ch- fy^^>^ <-*-,/-> 



Sni tcher 




HoTlOH 



RoLL 




STUDENTS IN SERVICE 

Jay Ashley, U. S. A. 
Bernard O. Bergstrom, U. S. A. 
Ben Crabtree, U. S. A. 
Spencer Crabtree, U. S. A. 
Charles Crary, U. S. A. 
Jerald Cook, U. S. A. 
Dee Crowley, U. S. A. 
William Eiden, U. S. A. 
Edward Hadley, U. S. A. 
Coy Hafey, U. S. N. 
Herman Hermansen, V. S. A. 
Hervie Hill, U. S. A. 
Byron Hitchcock, U. S. A. 
Roy Homedew, U. S. A. 
Leslie Johnson, U. S. A. 
Albert Joyner, U. S. A. 
Francis Judkins, U. S. A. 
Claud King, U. S. A. 
Jacob Kosel, U. S. A. 
Joe Koch, U. S. A. 
Charles Lane, U. S. A. 
Guy Lynde, U. S. A. 
Leonard McMartin, U. S. A. 
Douglass Misfeldt, U. S. A. 
Walter Moore, U. S. A. 
Ray Mueller, U. S. X. 
Leonard Pylman, U. S. X. 
Maurice Saunders, U. S. A. 
Rex Saunders, U. S. A. 
Fred Schook, U. S. A. 
John Schook, U. S. A. 
Chauncy Snow, U. S. A. 
Dean Stewart, U. S. A. 
Robert Walker, U. S. A. 
James Wallace, U. S. A. 
Creede Weir, U. S. A. 
Emil Weist, U. S. A. 
Wilbur Wheeler, U. S. A. 
Coyle Willis, U. S. A. 
Alfred Wolf, U. S. A. 
Earl Wvckoff, V. S. X. 




PAGE 17 








W 




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PAGE 18 




PAGE 19 




S'NITCHER 





Senior Class History^ and Prophecy^ 

N the fall of 1 9 1 I s. N, I. s. was surprised, startled, amazed, and delighted 
to behold a very enterprising group of children approach it.^ gates. Happily 
they worked and played there, and always they were admitted to i»<- the 
brightesl class thai ever originated there. They became Sophomores, then 
Juniors and finally attained the highest rank of all, SENIORS! Among their 
umber now we find athletic heroes, musical talent, dramatic ability and 
oratorical power. 

As the class of 'IS sat, in the rays of the morning sun before they separated to paths 
of life — a figure (dad in snowy white appeared. "Lo, I am Opportunity," said she. "Long 
have I waited your coming and now am I here to lead sou up the Mount of Wisdom ere 
you depart for the City of Success." They followed her and at last reached the 
summit. Mere with words of advice she left them and they parted, each pursuing In 
ua.\ alone. 

Ten years passed and we find that band of youths and maidens meeting once more 
before the portals of the City of Success. Each one was giving proof that he deserved an 
entrance here. 

First, a tall, graceful maiden cried in a firm, clear voice, "I have worked long and 
successfully in the cause 1 love" — behold Hazel Anderson, the leading suffragette. 

As she finished, a youth was heard saying- in determined accents, "The children shall 
learn," and all turned to behold Professor Bjur. 

A mild voice continued, "I live only to make my husband happy. 1 was once Clara 
Bjornstad." 

A thrill ran thru the band as a tall, light haired youth came forth. Then with one 
accord they shouted, "Dutch!" There stood the champion prize fighter, Charles Blumer, 

Three maidens in whit • caps and aprons claimed the attention next. "We cook for' 
the world and teach Food Conservation. Your old classmates, Bohling, Homedew and 
McCulley." 

A dainty little maiden tripped forward and assured them earnestly, "Why, I'm going 
to die some day." Behind her came a slight youth and softly it was murmured, "Mae 
and Shorty." 

In the distance a clear-, sweet voice was heard and before them appeared the famous 
Opera Star, Emily Callan, accompanied by her equally famous sister Carrie, the pianist. 

There was a momentary silence, then a brisk, dark-eyed maiden spoke, "I have or- 
ganized Clubs and Societies and can lead them all." 'Twas Ethel Clark. 



Two brothers stepped forward and bowed, 
of Wisdom." 



'The organizers of the Cram College 



"My only excuse for entering," announced another maiden, "is that my husband runs 
a garage." 

"Allow me to read the latest of my short stories to you," announced Miss DeLa Hunt, 
the authoress. Then as the tragedy was being read a scream was heard as Mrs. John 
Paul Jones fainted in her husband's arms. Whereupon Miss Peterson, the physician, ap- 
peared to revive her. 

Fpon the scene now came a tall gentleman. "Just try one of Dr. Miles Pain Pills, 
the panacea of all ills. My name is Froemke. Allow me to demonstrate — " 

He was interrupted by a sad, low feminine voice saying, "I was Mabel Gould. I am 
a widow. My husband died of a malady of the ears and in his memory I established a 
home for the deaf and dumb." 

"We," exclaimed three maidens, "will sow for the inmates," and off marched Knox, 
McGinnis, and Noess. 

"Please walk into my beauty parlor," said a faint voice as a slender maiden, once 
known as Daisy, advanced. "My husband shall print you a paper while I restore your 
complexion." 

Two school teachers of high degree then presented their diplomas reading H. Went- 
zel and J. Nelson. 

And gaily a maiden entered 
latest steps." 

A mighty voice interrupted as J. Porter, the orator, came towards them. A red 
''ha liners sited by and in it sat their former classmate, Agnes. 

Upon the stage; before them appeared a small maiden — a chorus girl named Alice. 

A girl in khaki passed and called over her- shoulder, "I am helping the soldiers by 
carrying their mail in Abe's Ford." 



saying, "Let the Nelson Dancing School teach you the 



Opportunity stepp< 
menda t ion. Enl er into 



forward. She smiled and said, "All of you ar 

he City of Success!" 



lit it led to com- 



<;i 10 




•NITCHER 



m$m^ u £i&°»m=i>°% 




Jacob Porter 

"Cub" 

Academic 

M. A. S. 

S. P. I. 

Snitcher Staff 

7 stand at the brink of a great career. 

Will someone please shove me off?" 



Charles Blumer 

"Chug" 

Normal Manual Training 

Snitcher Staff 

Football 

Basketball 

M. A. S. 

Boys Glee Club 

'A fine boy, but he needs to grow up a bit. 



Alpha Stine 

"Alpha" 

Home Economics 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

"Nobody would suppose it, but I'm naturally 

bashful." 



Mae Bowerman 

"Mae" 

Normal 

Alphian 

Y. W. C. A. 

'And fair she is, if that mine eyes be true.' 



Alice Shepard 

"Jimmy" 

Academic 

Alphian 

Girls Glee Club 

Thy actions proclaim thee still a child. 



Hazel Anderson 

"Ha{el" 

Normal 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Girls Glee Club 

'Three things doth shine, the sun, the moon, 

my hair." 



M*- 1 A -'h$M$WMM 




PAGE 21 




S N I T C H E R 




p^ 



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Clara Bjornstad 

Normal Home Economics 
Alphian 
Bethink thee on her virtues." 



Emil Bjur 

Y. M. C. A. 

M. A. S. 

S. P. I. 

Boys Glee Club 

Thy modesty is a candle to thy merit, 



Sarah Bohling 

"Sarah" 
Home Economics 
Delta Epsilon Phi 
'It is not permitted to know everything 



Carrie Callan 

"Carrie" 

Normal 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Snitcher Staff 

Girls Glee Club 

'Her good humor is a fountain never dry' 



Emily Callan 

"Emily" 

Academic 

Snitcher Staff 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Girls Glee Club 

'Graced with the power of voice. 



Ethel Clarke 

"Ethel" 

Normal 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Y. W. C. A. 

"And gladly wolde she lerne, and gladly 
teche." 



PAGE 22 




rrr\ r^T^^^h, 



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TCH ER 



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Wilbur Cram 
"Cram" 

Normal 

Boys Glee Club 

Y. M. C. A. 

Football 

M. A. S. 

S. P. I. 

'Strange to the world, he wore a bashful 

look." 



Gladys Da we 
"Gladys" 
Normal Home Economics 
'.-I winning way, a pleasant smile." 



Ruth De La Hunt 

"Ruthie" 

Normal Home Economics 

Alphian 

Snitcher Staff 

Girls Glee Club 

Y. W. C. A. 

'Happy and bright, winsome and gay, 

We all know Ruth in her own sweet way. 



Doris Dinnetz 
"Doris" 

Normal 
Snitcher Staff 

Alphian 
Y. W. C. A. 

'And there she goes, a-coming this way. 



Mable Gould 

"Mable" 

Normal 

Alphian 

Girls Glee Club 

Y. W. C. A. 

'With a mind of her own." 



Caston Herbert 
"Caston" 
Normal 
'Extremely busy, but quiet about it. 







PAGE 23 




1ST I T C H E R 





Daisy Hollan 

"Daisy" 

Normal 

Alphian 
'The world's no better, if we worry 
Life's no longer, if we hurry." 



LlLLIE HOMHDEW 

"Lillie" 

Normal 

Girls Glee Club 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Y. W. C. A. 

'Stately she is, and tall — who loves a dumpy 

woman?" 



Ethel Knox 

"Ethel" 

Normal 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Y. W. C. A. 

"A quiet seeker after knowledge. 



Mable McCully 

"Mable" 

Normal Home Economics 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Y .W. C. A. 

By diligence she wins her way." 



Lucille McGinnes 

"Lucille" 

Normal 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

'She does nothing in particular, and does it 

well." 



Elmer Cram 

"Cram" 

Academic 

Boys Glee Club 

Y. M. C. A. 

'All great men are dead, and I'm not feeling 

well." 



AGE 21 




x^w ^^c^Ov fa«rm^. rrm 



NITCH L R 




Esther Nelson 

"Esther" 
Girls Glee Club 
"Hither and thither, but whither- 
who knows?" 



Anna Noess 

"Anna" 

Normal 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Y. W. C. A. 

'A quiet, unassuming girl of sterling worth 



Jenny Nelson 

"Jenny" 

Normal 

'If you want learning you must work for it. 



Beulah Peterson 

"Ole" 

Normal 

Alphian 

Girls Glee Club 

Y. W. C. A. 

'She would stop St. Peter's roll call to as, 

a question." 



Emil Froemke 

"Froemke" 

Normal 

S. P. I. 

"Quiet and unassuming, but interested." 



Agnes Quam 

"Aggie" 

Commercial Academic 

"Many may be loved, but few much loved. 




PAGE 25 




1ST I T C H E R 




■' ■ P l , 1 ! ' ,]- 




iii rii 



Helen Wentzel 

"Helen" 

Normal 

'Search not to find what lies too deeply hid." 



Beulah Williams 

"Beulah" 

Normal 

Snitcher Staff 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Y. W. C. A. 

'With all her faults we love her still, the 

stiller the better." 



Leslie Miller 
Normal 
S. P. I. 

'Come, smile for the ladies." 



Harriette Miller 
"Mrs. Miller" 
Normal Home Economics 
'Domestic bliss is mine" 



Jessie Wyckoff 
Normal 
'A perfect woman, nobly planned, 
To warn, to comfort, and command. 



Gertrude Zieman 

"Trudie" 

Normal 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Y. W. C. A. 

'Study — thy pursuit is joy." 



PAGE 26 




CLASS 0' 19 



PAGE 27 



Junior- Class Hi&ory" 



Officers 

President — John Paul Jones 

Vice President — Margaret Whir 

Secretary — Mildred Peterson 

Treasurer — George Brown 

Student Social Committee — Evelyn Buckmiller, Herbert Pease 

Faculty Advisors — Miss Natwick, Mr. Campbell 




HEN the Class of '19 began to arrive upon the scene of action some three 
years ago, the more discerning members of the faculty recognized the fact that 
the collection contained many diamonds in the rough. Registration, the 
grinding process, began. Needless to say, the task required a skilled hand. 
But as time passed, the stones became jewels, and begin to take on a most beautiful luster. 
Brilliantly they reflected back every ray of light imparted by perspiring instructors, who 
fully realized that the rarer the jewel, the harder the task of shaping it. 

Nevertheless, the responses to their efforts were gratifying enough, and the stones 
were rapidly being shaped for the final setting — life. Ambition and talent were not lack- 
ing, for note the prominent parts taken by our members in the various contests and 
operettas since they have been in school. Such ambition, power, and talent cannot fail 
to make its impression upon society when at last the faculty sees fit to present it with a 
sheepskin and place it before an impatiently waiting world. 

May the Class of '19 make as large a place for itself in life as it has in school! 



PAGE 28 




rrr\ r^^^O?. 



•TNT I T C H E R 




John Paul Jones 

"Steve" 

Snitcher Staff 

Boys Glee Club 

Basketball 

'Within his heart was her image" 

Margaret E. Weir 

"Maggie" 

Snitcher Staff 

Alphian 

Mecca For Pep 

Y. W. C. A. 

'To know her you have but to hear her 

laugh" 

G. Mildred Peterson 

"Millie" 

Alphian 

Mecca For Pep 

Y. W. C. A. 

'Our youngest and our dearest sat, 

Lifting her large, sweet asking eyes" 



- ' • - ' 



George B. Brown 

"Fat" 

Football 

Basketball 

'Love lies in his eyes and lies and lies and 

lies" 



Dorothea K. Shryock 

"Dot" 

Alphian 

Y. W. C. A. 

'Gray eyes that sparkle and a temper to 

match" 



Verda J. Brown 

Alphian 

Mecca for Pep 

Y. W. C. A. 

'So sweet a face, such angel grace." 




PAGE 29 




rrr\ 



i&^rm^ rnn 



Ts[ I T C H E R 



7 d&° < ^^^ZSBSSSH 




_____ 




l.si HER G. BlI.l.l.Y 

Snitcher Staff 

Alphian 
Mecca For Pep 
"An adept in the use of eyes" 



Esther H. Hogona 

"Hogona" 

Alphian 

Y. W. C. A. 

Mecca For Pep 

'Modest, simple and sweet, the very type of 

Pr is cilia" 



Helen Kieffer 
Alphian 
Mecca For Pep 
Girls Glee Club 
"Helen, thy beauty is to me 
Like those Nicean barks of yore' 



Victor E. Young 

"Vic" 

S. P. 1. 

Y. M. C. A. 

M. A. S. 

Boys Glee Club 

Football 

'Ah! that I might be as sure of anything as 

he is of everything" 

Flora M. Benz 

Alphian 

Y. W. C. A. 

Mecca For Pep 

Girls Glee Club 

'She doeth little kindnesses, which most 

people leave undone" 

Inez F. Sullivan 

"Fussy" 
Delta Epsilon Phi 
Mecca For Pep 
'She smiles on many just for fun, 
We know there 's nothing in it." 



PAGE 30 




w>-v ^T^^^Ch. AV^P^^^ rw-> 



TNI I T C H E R 




Irene Shrader 

Alphian 
Mecca For Pep 
'Ne'er made less beautiful the blue 
Unclouded heaven of her eyes" 



Evelyn Buckmiller 
"Buck" 
Alphian 

Mecca For Pep 
Absence makes the heart groic fonder" 



Dorris Farrier 

Girls Glee Club 
'When )oy and duty clash, let duty go to 
smash" 



AlLEEN TUTTLE 

"Tut" 
Alphian 
Y. W. C. A. 
Mecca For Pep 
Girls Glee Club 
'Always working, when she isn't doing some- 
thing else" 

Selma Strand 

Snitcher Staff 

Boys Glee Club 

Y. M. C A. 

M. A. S. 

S. P. I. 

'There is an atmosphere of kindness about 

that man" 

Nina J. Martinson 
"Martin" 

Alphian 

Y. W. C. A. 

Mecca For Pep 

'Playful blushes that seemed naught 
But luminous escapes of thought" 




PAGE 31 




s-cy\ ^7 y^ 



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r-»<r;tr->. msi 



S'"N I T C H E R 





H. Helen Bii.u.y 
Alphian 
Mecca For Pep 
'Still waters run deep" 



Herbert Pease 

"Shorty" 
Football 

Basketball 
"He is a little chimney, heated hot in a 
moment" 



Mable Knox 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Mecca For Pep 

"And her cheek was like a rose in the snow' 



Kathryn Banninga 

Snitcher Staff 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Girls Glee Club 

'Grew a tall and slender maiden 
Grew up like the prairie lilies" 



Carl Meier 

"Preach" 

Y. M. C. A. 

S. P. I. 

Boys Glee Club 

'The outside of his head is a little rusty, hut 

the inside is not" 



Pearl Joseph 
'Slow and steady wins the race" 



PAG] 




NI TCH ER 




Arthur N. Edwards 

"Art" 

S. P. I. 

'There is a great deal of oratory in me, but 

I don't do as well as I can out of respect to 

Daniel Webster" 



Agnes Burkhardt 
"Aggie" 

Alphian 

Y. W. C. A. 

Mecca For Pep 

'She puts worry down in the bottom of her 

heart, sits on the lid, and smiles" 



Alpha Ellisen 

"Ellisen" 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Mecca For Pep 

Girls Glee Club 

'Laugh and the world laughs with you" 



Gladys T. Zieman 

"Gladys" 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Y. W. C. A. 

Mecca For Pep 

"All she asks is plenty of atmosphere' 



Frank Davis 

"Davey" 
Football 
"Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers 1 



Delia Hafey 
Delta Epsilon Phi 
Mecca For Pep 
"A cherub's face — a rascal all the rest' 




PAGE 33 




N ITC HER 





Lucy M. Kahi is 

"Karts" 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

Mecca For Pep 

Girls Glee Club 

"A lover of nature — adores Snow" 

LeRoy LeMaster 

"Roy" 
Snitcher Staff 
Basketball 
"Sweet was the light of his eyes" 

Ruth R. Weir 

Alphian 

Y. W. C. A. 

Mecca For Pep 

"Ga^e into her eyes and you will see an angel 

Gafe longer and you will see a little imp" 



Gloy Y. Sullivan 

Delta Epsilon Phi 

'Nature knows exactly how to mix her colors' 



Katherine J. MacFarland 

"Marie" 
Delta Epsilon Phi 
'She blended in a like degree 
The vixen and the devotee" 



George Kabrud 

"Kah" 

Snitcher Staff 

Football 
Boys Glee Club 
'She's going to turn me down. 
1 can just feel it" 



PAGE 34 




TAGE 35 




/ V. v, •>*-•. . ■; }d _v_ 



S'NI TCHER 




Sophomore Hi&oryf 




Officers 

President — Harley Ferri i 

Vice President — Dewey McCafferty 

Secretary — Uva St. Ores 

Treasurer — Althka Betzer 

Faculty Advisors — (). F. Anderson, Marjorie Keck 

N the fall of the year '17, when the Faculty members were preparing their 
"Ivory Carving Machine" for the new '17-'! 8 drive, their ocular organs 
gleamed with undeniable satisfaction as they rested upon th Clan of '20. 
Here was the new target ! 
What then must be the initial velocity of this wonderful brain-seeking projectile? 
That note-worthy class, however, proved to be within easy range and was pro- 
nounced "An Undeveloped Human Gold Mine," by the target seekers. 

With every person in the group a nugget in himself and with A.nton Swanson as 
mascot, how could the Class of '20 reasonably fail? Their talents have been developed 
to such a high degree that now in their Sophomore year they have made a record among 
records. Members of this class are found in every organization of the school in which 
brains, talent and art are required. They have led their Class to victory in all contests 
and school activities. 

Other classes have glorified themselves in their wonderful phenomena, their unparal- 
leled fetes ; however, the Sophomores do not enclose themselves, nor bask within the 
brilliant tints of this so-called "red, white and blue circus lemonade." 

We proudly assert that our class lacks conceit. To be perfectly frank, — "we aim to 
deliver the goods." We seldom miss our mark. We have a happy attitude toward destiny, 
a passion for the growth of our school, and the ambition to be of service to our fellow-men. 



PAGE 36 




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PAGE 39 




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Freshman Class 



Officers 



President — Earl Clarke 

Vice President — Winnie Brown 

Secretary — Ruth Putnam 

Treasurer — Grace Davis 

Student Social Committee — Ella Roberts, Glen Talbott 

Faculty Advisors — Miss Potts, Mr. Fuller 




HE Freshman Class History, is as you will notice, very brief. It will consist 
only of an introduction which is all that is necessary. 

The Class was organized with a total number of forty-five members 
and with full approval of the entire Faculty and fellow students. 

The members are of a kind and pleasing disposition, therefore living 
up to their motto. The individuals attempted to furnish a very brief history 
for the Snitcher but so far have not accomplished much in that line for we have not ap- 
peared in public "Yet," but hope to soon, so not until then can we say much about 
ourselves. 

The Freshman Class may be considered green but we have never yet been so green 
as are those of the former years, so we consider that we and our history show that the world 
is progressing. 

That we were not unnoticed in our first weeks of school is attested by the fact that 
the seniors asked some of us to accompany them to the first term dance. 

As the history of the Freshman is at this time a thing of the future we shall forego the 
writing of it for the present, knowing that the reality will so far surpass imagination that 
an attempt at prophetic description would not do it justice. 
"Watch the Freshies." 



PAGE 40 




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SvN I T C H E R 




c Uhird Year- and Special Students 



Third Year Students 

President — Mary Khlsh 
Vice President — Edith Jeffers 

Secretary — Cecil Snow 
Treasurer — Genevieve Kieffer 




HE Third Year Students and Specials have combined this year and form a 
large, active, enthusiastic class who have done their part in promoting social 
and student activity. They are students who, wishing to become more 
efficient for life's vocation, pursue special lines of work. 

The Special Students are those taking special work along different 
lines, but mostly along the musical line. We have members who are very 
young, but have such command of the piano that they play with the grace and skill of 
artists. When a few more years crown them we expect them to be very efficient. 

The Third Year Class is comprised of those taking five year courses, the five year 
normal, Normal Home Economics and Normal Manual Training. Knowing that we get 
from this world just what we give, they intend to make their work that of teaching. 

Education is acquired only by hard work and time. Every one of the class is wait- 
ing for the time when they may go out into the world and work for the benefit of human- 
ity. With this in mind our motto is "Efficiency and Service." 

Special Students 

President — Ruth Hass 

Vice President — Arthur Strutz 

Secretary — Irma Shepard 

Treasurer — Amy Cook 



PAGE 44 




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HE students taking the short course in Farm Engineering at the N. I. are 
divided into two classes, the first term students and those who are here for 
the second winter. 

The classes of 191 8 were composed of young men who came to the S. 
N. I. S. for business, rather than for pleasure and are a fine lot of fellows. Most of these 
men took active part in the boy's literary societies and Y. M. C. A. work 

Francis Kelch, of the second term class, seemed the nautral leader or skopesman 
of the class and, due largely to his enthusiasm, there was organized early in the term a 
basketball team from their number, of which he was general manager and William 
Link was captain. In this field of athletics they made a place for themselves and at all 
times have been found to be loyal supporters of the school. 

It is the ambition of these young men to become efficient North Dakota farmers and 
to do this it is necessary that they learn the theory and operation of the farm tractor. A 
new tractor in most cases is in fine working condition when the purchaser begins to use 
it, but under tremendous strains and continued service it begins to fail in many or all 
parts. The young man whose ear is trained to the proper tone of his engine is quick to 
dect the slightest change or the faintest click that is strange, but that is not efficient train- 
ing of itself. He must know how to dismantle, reassemble and repair parts that are worn 
or broken. In short, he should be a mechanic. The short course student devotes much of 
his time in the various shops and acquires some skill and knowledge of the mechanic arts. 

These young men are high privates in the rear ranks in the present struggle for 
freedom, but in most cases that is not all, they are also general, captain, lieutenant, cor- 
poral, flunkey, cook and guard. The rear trenches scatter over the broad, fertile plains 
of Dakota and these boys are there to stick, recruits or no recruits. Nine Rahs for the 
Short Course Boys ; come on ; let's go. 



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PAGE 50 




LITERARY] 

EO'TCR 



Business 

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EDITOR 




"THE 

SniTCHER 
STAFF 



PA(JE 51 




S'NI'TCifER 




■■■■IIIOIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 




Snitcher Staff 1917-18 



Editor in Chief Jacob Porter 

Associate Editor Le Roy Le Master 

Literary Editor Margaret Weir 

Associate Literary Editor Ruth De La Hunt 

Business Manager John Paul Jones 

Associate Business Manager Doris Dinnetz 

Art Editor Preston Porter 

Associate Art Editor Esther Billey 

Athletic Editor George Kabrud 

Associate Athletic Editor Emil Bjur 

Alumni Editor Carrie Callan 

Circulation Editor Katherine Banninga 

Faculty Editor Beulah Williams 

Organization Editor Charles Blumer 

Assistant Organization Editor Inez Sullivan 

Activity Editor Emily Callan 

Photographer Selmer Strand 

Joke Editor Harley Ferree 





PAGE '<-i 




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Editorial 




D5J0NT KICK— that is, don't KICK us; right 



here and now, we pass the BUCK. If you 
don't like this book, go after the censors. 
They passed everything in it. But then it 
might be worse. Anyway we hope so. We must, too, 
thank everybody that helped us put out this book. The 
Staff did their part and the faculty and student body at 
large cooperated nobly. Hoping that the result is satis- 



factory to everybody, we go to press. 



EDITOR. 



M 



PAGE 53 




1ST IT CHE R 





I 'AGE 54 



ORGANIZATIONS 



1 




PAGE 55 




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c Uhe Alphian Literary Society^ 




Organized 1906 — Miss Carolyn Evens (Mrs. W. M. Kern) 
Re-Organized 19 10 — Miss Gabriella C. Brendemuhl 

be fully alive, every school must have its student organizations, and it is 
only natural that each organization shall take a pardonable pride in its own 
achievements. By constant and determined effort, from modest beginnings, 
success is ultimately attained. 

The Alphian Literary Society now has a dozen years to its credit in the 
matter of growth. Founded upon the theory that one attains proficiency in 
any line of work only by performing that work, the society seeks the thorough development 
of each individual member along various lines of literary activity. 

With a close organization, limited membership, unfaltering loyalty, and a lively in- 
terest in the work at hand, the members attain a high degree of confidence for larger 
spheres of community effort, later. Careful preparation of assigned parts, and weekly 
meetings, planned with painstaking care, give an opportunity for constant interchange of 
ideas, and keeps the work up to the high standard set by the organization. 

To extend the interest beyond the borders of the society, the members occasionally 
meet in an open session with the faculty, or citizens of the town. Nor, is the social life 
neglected. Each term the society enjoys an informal social session. The Chapter banquet, 
held annually, gives the active members an opportunity to meet those Alphians who have 
gone out to put into practice the principles they have learned. 

But in whatever capacity the Alphians assemble, they are true to the sentiment ex- 
pressed in their motto : 

"Greatly begin ! tho thou have time 
But for a line, be that sublime, 
Not failure, but low aim, is crime." 



PAGE 57 




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ffi^ory of fte M A. S. 



President — Cecil Snow 

Vice President — Emil Froemke 

Secretary — Wm. Hedlund 

Sergeant at Arms- — Leonard Reager 



IE 



T the beginning of the winter term in the year 191 2 there came to the N. I. 
about three dozen young men, leaving the care of stock and building of the 
morning fires in the hands of younger or older brothers, that they might take 
up again a new phase of school work. The steam and gas tractor had begun 
to play an important part in farm work and the boys had a sort of "hankering" to know 
what was inside the cylinder that made the thing go. 

New and strange surroundings made these fellows lonely and home sick, It is true 
the Y. M. C. A. was here, as also was the S. P. I., but something was lacking for the new 
boys. Mr. Fields, then assistant in the Mechanic Arts Department and also instructor in 
Farm Engineering, organized the Farm Engineering Society, which met every Thursday 
evening for discussions, debates and lectures on subjects of interest to the short course 
students. These meetings were interesting and well attended although Robert's Rules ot 
Order, were struck with 42 C. M. shells frequently. This, however, was the beginning of the 
Mechanic Arts Society. The new name being assumed after a sort of marriage between 
the engineering students and the regular Mechanic Arts students. 

The Mechanic Arts Society has played an important part in the school life of many 
of our graduates and students, and a few laurels have come its way. 

The great world war has thrown its tentacles so profusely that even the two boys' 
societies of the N. I. have failed to escape, and as a result it became advisable in the fall 
of 19 1 7 to combine the two societies in such a way that each could still maintain its own 
officers and constitution. 

During the past year this joint society with the new girls literary society, Delta 
Epsilon Phi, staged in Carnegie Hall, the play, "She Stoops to Conquer," which was well 
attended and gave evidence of much hard work. 

The society is well represented in most of the school contests and is not ashamed of 
its record or the record of its individual members. Space does not allow of the listing of 
the names of its past and present officials, suffice to say they are all "making good," and 
much is expected of them. 

The aim of the society is as ever, "On and Up," in spite of the "Kaiser and Kulture." 



page 59 







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PAGE 60 



Young Mens Christian 
Association 



Officers 

William Hedlund, President 

Selmer E. Strand, Vice President 

Emil Bjur, Secretary 

Emil Dethlefson, Treasurer 

Advisory Committee — Prof. O. E. Combellick, Prof. H. Brown, Prof. R. L. Ashley 

History 

HE year 1918, the tenth anniversary of the organization has, indeed, been a 
busy year. When the association was first organized, and up to a few 
years ago, a very small portion of the student body was concerned with it ; 
while now the Y. M. C. A. numbers the larger part of the boys in school. 
We are proud of the fact that we are a part of the World's Student 
Christian Federation which is at present doing so much for the war work. As 
part of the federation we are doing our share which is shown by the fact that in Decem- 
ber, 1 91 7, assisted by our sister association, we took up a subscription of three hundred 
dollars, among our students and faculty, for the Student Friendship War Fund. What 
this money is doing needs no comment here. We read about it in the daily papers, while 
the letters we are receiving from the camps in this country as well as from the boys over 
seas bear not only the "red triangle," but in his own hand our brother or friend or class- 
mate is unstinted in his praise of the "Y", the home of those away from home. 

During the past year we have increased our service to the men here by equipping 
and maintaining a room to which every man in school is welcomed for recretation and play. 
The main purpose of the association here in school is to help the new men get located ; 
give them friendly advice in matters pertaining to school, and perhaps not least of all 
to help those that come to school Christian men, to maintain their Christianity, and if 
possible lead others to come in touch with the life of the great teacher, Jesus Christ. 




PAGE 61 




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Swangstu, Benz, McCulley, Davis, Finch, Martinson, Wirch, Leichner 

Young Women's Christian Association 

Faculty Advisors— Miss Harnsberger, Miss Natwick, Miss Potts 

President — Mary M. Wirch 

Vice President — Sarah Swangstu 

Treasurer — Vera Finch 

Secretary — Nina Martenson 

Committees 

Devotional Committee — Flora Benz ; Associate News Committee — Grace Davis ; Bible 

Study Committee — Salome Leichner; Practical Service Committee — Kathryn Banninga ; 

Social Committee — Mabel McCulley; Missionary Committee — Alma Stafsberg 




HE Young Women's Christian Association is an important factor of a com- 
plete course in any school. The definite nature of its work helps to make 
the school course one which insures the development of the student phy- 
sically, intellectually and spiritually. By the sincere efforts put forth in its 
cause the members derive satisfaction in work well done. The Association's 
cause is the cause of humanity. For that reason the organization's aim is 
high and the genuine worker- will endeavor to reach it to some degree. 

The Young Women's Christian Association of the State Normal and In- 
dustrial School holds its meetings every Wednesday evening. They are led by the mem- 
bers themselves or by an invited speaker from outside. The proceeds of the annual bazaar 
usually go to defray the expenses of delegates to the various conventions. But this 
year, a new problem developed by the war, faced the association for the first time in its 
history. In answer to the general appeal, our Young Women's Christian Association gave 
the proceeds of this year's bazaar- to the student War Fund. That it may be more effi- 
cienl in dealing with social problems before students today, our branch has taken up 
the national movement for the study of Christian World Democracy. As a result four 
classes of fifteen young women each with competent leaders have been organized. 

The Young Men's Christian Association goes to the front with our boys. But just as 
the Women remain behind so the women's branch of this splendid organization remains 
on the home shores. And so everywhere throughout our land the Voung Women's Chris- 
linn Association stands reads' to do its noble bit. 



PAGE 62 




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S'N'IT'C'H'E'R 




History of {he Orpheus and Shuhevt 
Glee Clubs 



Choral Leader — Miss Margorih Kick 
Pianist — Miss Ruth Haas 
Historian — Victor Young 



Orpheus Glee Club 

President — Chas. Blumer 

Vice President — Geo. Kabrud 

Treasurer — Paul Putnam 

Librarian — Victor Young 



Shubert Glee Club 

President — Emily Callan 

Vice President — Carrie Callan 

Treasurer — Alpha Ellison 

Librarian — Lucy Kartes 




HE Orpheus and Shubert Glee Clubs were organized in the fall of 191 3. 

These voluntary organizations offer unusual advantages to all young people of 

the school. Music is an art that is not bestowed upon all people. It is only 

those people that are gifted who glory in its accomplishment, but the music 

itself is interwoven into the very heart emotions of the world. It like no 

other art, touches the soul of man, awakens beautiful memories, ?nd voices 

the deepest feelings of harmony. Music lends enchantment to our lives; for in it we forget 

our troubles and float away to that far away land of rapture and contentment. 

It is the object of these Glee Clubs to learn and understand the art of music. From 
the days of their infancy, under the direction of Mr. Jacob Schultz, these organizations 
have achieved success. 

The first debut of any note was the rendition of the operetta "Sylvia." This was a 
grand success, and added a decided musical distinction to the State Normal and Industrial 
School. In the following year, 191 4, the Glee Clubs appeared in the famous operetta 
"Balful." In the year 191 5, the music department was under the supervision of the Misses 
Holte and Howell. "The Chocolate Soldier," the first operetta given under their combined 
direction, together with Miss Alson as instructor in expression, was the deciding factor in 
revealing the possibilities of our Clubs. During 1916 the Glee Clubs presented "The 
Bo'sn's Bride" in a most satisfactory manner. Last year, 1917, the operetta "The Drum 
Major," was pronounced as an unequalled success. This season, 191 8, the Glee Clubs 
were triumphant in rendering their chef-d'oeuvre "The Captain of Plymouth." The at- 
tendance this year has been a larger one than in any previous year. 

These organizations participate not only in the annual operetta, but also appear in 
recitals, and render selections on special occasions and commencement week. 

The Orpheus and Shubert Glee Clubs have laid their foundations well, and if they 
continue their good success and accomplishments they will become an essential part in the 
musical life of our institution. 



PAGE fi4 




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S'NITCHER 





HE enrollment of the State Normal and Industrial School make necessary the 
existence of two literary societies for girls, and on Oct. 30, 191 7, the Delta 
Epsilon Phi Society was organized with a membership of forty-four. The 
following officers were elected : 



President — Mabel McCulley 

Vice President — Kathryn Banninga 

Treasurer — Ethel Clarke 

Recording Sec. — Katherine Macfarlane 

Corresponding Sec. — Gladys Zieman 

Sergeant at Arms — Delia Hafey 

Historian — Ruth Haas 



The society is strictly modern in its methods, the work being carried on as an up to 
date Woman's Club and representing all phases of work of interest to young women. The 
purpose of the society is to train its members for leadership in the communities into which 
they go. 

The society stands for the highest ideals of scholarship, friendship and true loyalty 
to the institution of which it is so important a part. 



SENIORS 
Hazel Anderson 
Sarah Bohling 
Carrie Callan 
Emily Callan 
Ethel Clarke 
Ruth Haas 
Lillie Homedew 
Ethel Knox 
Mabel McCulley 
Lucille McGinnis 
Anna Noess 
Alpha Stine 
Beulah Williams 
Gertrude Zieman 

JUNIORS 
Kathryn Banninga 
Alpha Ellison 
Florence Fulton 
Delia Hafey 
Edith Jeffers 



Charter Members 

Lucy Kartes 
Mabel Knox 
Katherine Macfarlane 
Esther Noess 
Gloy Sullivan 
Inez Sullivan 
Gladys Zieman 

SOPHOMORES 
Althea Benzer 
Anna Grundfelder 
Alma Stafsberg 
Mary Wirch 

FACULTY 
Tilda Natwick 
Lulu Potts 
Maude Finley 
Marguerite Keck 
Edith Johns 

FRESHMEN 
Esther Bloomquist 
Grace Davis 



Maude George 
Lela Mount 
Olive Neff 
Ella Roberts 
Eva Schmierer 
Freda Simmons 

PLEDGES 
Grace Bartow 
Bessie Coleman 
Mary Elliott 
Hazel Feather 
Theresia Grundfelder 
Ina Jacobson 
Thelma King 
Harrietla Miller 
Helen Noess 
Minnie Schaller 
Uva St. Ores 
Laura Tjostem 
Carrie Walz 



page 6; 




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Miss Potts — Faculty Advisor 
Cabinet 



President — Mabel Gould 

Vice President — Beulah Peterson 

Secretary — Mabel McCulley 

Treasurer — Flora Benz 

Hike Manager — Margaret Weir 



Posture Manager — Delia Hafey 

Frolic Manager — Agnes Burkhardt 

Athletic Manager — Alpha Stine 

Exhibition Manager — Lillie Homedew 

-Nina Martinson 



Festival Manager- 



History 




HE fall of 1 91 6 marked the beginning of a new organization in the school. 
Purely athletic in nature, this society had for its purpose the promoting of 
an all around physical development of the young ladies of the State Normal 
and Industrial School, and was fittingly named the "Mecca for Pep." 

With Ada Peterson as the first president the "Mecca" sprang quickly 
from promising plans to an active reality. A Christmas pageant in Decem- 
ber and a gymnasium exhibition in March added evidence to the regular frolics that the 
"Mecca" was fully alive. In the spring term, with Anna Hermansen as the second presi- 
dent, a picnic and May Festival were given, and monograms were given for hiking, good 
posture, and volley ball. 

In 191 7- 1 8 the "Mecca" is easily holding its place in the school life. Several frolics 
have been enioyed, as was the second annual gymnasium exhibition. A Greek Pageant and 
May Festival, and the usual society picnic in the spring term, are being looked forward 
to with much interest. American Posture League pins will be awarded, and monograms 
given for society and excellence in gymnastic work. 

With each year proving more completely that it is truly the "Mecca for Pep," it 
requires no prophet to foretell a long and active life for this organization. 



PAGE 69 



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o\°. I. Orchestra 



E. W. Ackert, Director 





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Nelson, Ashley, Froemke, Ackert, Knopp, Fields, Shryock, Stine, Ferree, Neilson 



PAGE 71 




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PAGE 72 




PAGE 73 




Sn itch er 




CAthletics 1917-18 



O. E. Anderson, Coach 





WING to the war conditions 
most schools have suffered more 
or less this year in the matter 
of athletics, the State Normal 
and Industrial School among the rest. But 
in spite of the discouraging outlook we have 
passed thru a fairly satisfactory season of 
sports. Concerted efforts on the part of the 
men on the teams, the loyal support of the 
student body made up for any shortcomings 
that existed. 



Football 1917 



Football at the N. I. as in most of the other schools of the state was hit rather 
hard last fall, first by the fact that so many of the boys entered school late, and second, be- 
cause the team was unable to secure the usual series of high school games to put them into 
proper condition. Then for various reasons, outside games had to be cancelled. The team 
was also handicapped by the lack of experienced men. The squad was practically new 
and at no time did the same team enter upon the gridiron for two successive games. Of 
the three games played, we lost one to Jamestown, one to Valley City, and one to 
Aberdeen. Great credit, however, is due the bovs of both first and scond teams for mak- 
ing such a good showing in the face of such trying conditions. 



PAGE 74 




NITCHER 



mmcm^" e&° • w&*m 




George Brown, "Fat," Full Back, Captain 

A bulwark of strength and an excellent back-field man. 



Floyd Brown, "Bat," Quarter Back and Left Half Back 

"One of the famous Brown brothers." And a man who 
always played a hard game. 




Charles Blumer, "Chug," Right Half Back 

A big man who always played his part in every game 



Herbert Pease, Quarter Back and Left End, "Shorty" 

Little, but Oh, my! Made the only touchdown of the 
season. 




PAGE 75 




Snitch er 




Arthur Strutz, "'/'be Old Reliable," Center 

"Old Reliable" may well be applied to him as he was 
always "there." 



Frank Davis, "Davy," Right End 

"Davy" was a good man and always broke up the end 
runs coming his way. 





Paul Putnam, "Pud," Right Guard 

A new man but a "Comer." Watch "Pud" next fall. 



Victor Young, "Vic," Right Tackle 

Made a sturdy line man and one who was a "sticker. 




PAGE 76 




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1ST IT CHE R 



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Theodore Northrop, "Ted," Left Half Back 

"Ted's" first year out, and he played his part splendidly. 



Wesley Brown, "Poodle," Left Tackle 

"Poodle's" first year on the team was naturally good. 





Edwin Christinson, "Christie," Left Guard 

"Christie" made a good line man and was one who worked 
hard. 



Wilbur Cram, "Cram," Sub., Guard 

A good man but was kept out of the games because of in- 
juries received in Aberdeen game. 




TAGE 77 




S'N ITCHER 




(haslet (Ball 1918 




Anderson (Coach), F. Brown, Dawson, LeMasters, L. Pease, G. Brown, Blumer, H. Pease 



The basketball season of 191 8 was one of the best the N. I. has enjoyed. With an 
unusually strong team we played a series of eleven games, losing only three out of the 
entire number. Experience gave the boys confidence, so after the loss of the first game 
to the University of North Dakota and the second to the Aberdeen Northern Normal, the 
team began to make a winning score, the first victory being won over Valley City. The 
trip south proved a decided success, the loss of only one game to the South Dakota State 
College at Brookings being recorded against us. With all these victories behind us we 
have reason to be proud of our team, which unquestionably ranks with the best in the 
state. With the first team in excellent trim backed by a faithful second team, the basket- 
ball season ended with a total score that is a credit to the school as a whole. 



PAGE 78 




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^Baseball 



Baseball, always one of the popular sports, this year will suffer considerably from 
the fact that so many boys have left school in answer to our country's call. Since this 
condition prevails generally throughout the schools included in the state conference, few 
interscholastic games will be attempted. But enthusiasm for this popular American game 
already shows signs of coming to the rescue, so we shall continue to keep baseball alive 
among ourselves. 



Gymnastics 



This year the boys came into their own on the score of indoor gymnastics. Regular 
classes in the usual light and heavy gymnastic exercises have become a settled feature of 
this course. In March this department gave its first Annual Gymnastic Exhibit which 
proved a decided success, both by acquainting the public with the nature of the work 
carried on, and by showing the boys themselves what can be done along this line. 



Track 



Track work within the school holds great possibilities of development. With an An- 
nual Interscholastic Track and Field Meet for high schools under the auspices of the N. 
I. already established, we have made a good beginning for this valuable form of training for 
young men. 

The following are a few football instructions by Coach Anderson 

If you wish to catch the ball, 

Hurry! 
It may never come again, 

Hurry! 
If you are a second late, 
And you find they've shut the gate 
Climb the fence — but never wait, 

Hurry: 

Even tho you come to grief, 

Hurry! 
Save a minute, time is cash, 
Grab that Pill and make a dash 
Don't care if you come to smash. 

Hurry! 



PAGE 7 9 








Weavers of {he lS[. I. Monogram 



Football 

Floyd Brown — '12, '13, '14, '15, 17 

Clell Bentley, Capt. — '12, '16 

Charles Crary — '12, '13, 14, '16 

Vern Crary — '12, '13, '14 Capt. 

Joseph Boyd — '12, '13 Capt. 

Leroy Pease — '14, '15, '16, '17 

James Vandanacker — '12 

George Brown — '14, '15, '16, '17 

Linvill Townsend — '12, '13 

F"rancis Abraham — '14 

Cleve Malin — '12, '14 

Merl Comstock — '14 

Harry Nichols — '12, '13, '14, Capt. '15 

Arthur Strutz — '14, '15, '17 

Edwin Canfield — ' 1 2 

John Dawe — '14, '1 5 

Leonard McMartin — '12, '13, '16 

Jay Ashley — '14, '15, '16 

Walter DeLaHunt — '12 

Stanley Fleming — '15, '16 

Edwin Sauer — '13, '14 

Joseph Carpenter — '15 

Francis Judkins — '13, '14 

Ira Morgans- — '1 5 

Emmet McGraw — '13 

Jay Harm — '13, '14 

John Ackerman — '1 5 

Stanley Johnson — '13 

Ralph Oertli— '15 

Frank Callan — '13, '14, '15 

Bron Hitchcock — '13 

Howard Barnes — ' 1 3 

Charles Blumer — '16, '17 

Rex Saunders — '16 

Andrew Hultstrand — '16 

Thos. Lee — '16 

Fred Walz — '1 5, '6 

Maro Jahr — '16 

James Peterson — '16 

Fred Leasure — '16 

Harvey Hill — '16 

Herbert Pease — '17 

Ed. Christenson — '17 

Frank Davis — '17 

Theodore Northrop — ' 1 7 

Paul Putnam — '17 

Wilbur Cram — '17 

Victor Young — '17 

Wesley Brown — '17 

llarley Ferree — '17 



Baseball 

Emmet McGraw, '13, Capt. '14, '15 

Edwin Canfield — ' 1 3 

Lloyd Meyers — '1 3 

Arthur Strut/. — '13, '14, '15, '16 Capt. 

Walter DeLaHunt — '13, '14 

Joseph Carpenter — '13, '14 Capt., '15 

Edwin Sauer — '13, '14, '15 Capt. 

Christian Thue — '13, '14 

Floyd Brown — '14, '15 

Silas McCulloch — '13, '14 

Francis Judkins — '14 

Joseph Koch — '15 

Jay Ashley — '15, '16, '17 

Thomas Lee — '15, '16, '17 

Ira Morgans, '15, '16, '17 

Merl Comstock — ' 1 5 

Leroy Pease — '16, '17 

Walter Quam — '17 

Leslie Johnson — '17 

Paul Rheberg — '17 

Spender Crabtree — '17 

Stanley Fleming — '16, '17 

Harvey Hill — '16, '17 

Ernest Wood — '16, '17 

Walter More — '17 

Basketball 

James Vandanacker — '13, '14 

Joseph Boyd — '13, '14 

Ben Crabtree — ' 1 3 

Joe Bentley — '13 

Clell Bentley— '13 

Lloyd Myers — '13, '14 

Emmet McGraw — '13, '14, Capt. '15 

Floyd Brown — '14, 'i<>, Capt. '16, '17, '18 

Charles Crary — '14 

Joseph Carpenter — '14, '15, '16 Capt. 

Joseph Koch — '1 5 

Jacob Dawson — '15, ' 18 

Leroy Pease — '15, '16, '17, '18 

George Brown — ' 15, '17, Capt. ' 1 8 

Stanley Fleming — '16, '17 

Clayton Geer — '16, '17 

Neil Farrell — '16 

Jay Ashley — '17 

Chas. Blumer — '17, '18 

Herbert Pease — ' 18 

LeRoy LeM aster — ' 1 8 



PAGE so 




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Cecil Snow, First Lieutenant 



Victor Young 
Second Lieutenant 



PAGE 83 




WHY DOHT VOL/ READ THE 
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD 

ANDGET SOME oooo ones 



I'AGE 84 




mr\ r^?^Ch. 



N ITCH ER 




KUMING ! 



Kampbell's Kaptivating Kemistry Kids 

being the 

Klassical Kapers of the Klever Koeds 

of the 

! Karefree Kemistry Klass ! 

Kontaining a Kaustic Kommedian, A Kouple of Kupid-Krazed 
Kreatures, and a Running, Kantankerous Krammer! Konducted 
and Kompiled by Kampbell, Klimbing Kollector of Krumbs! ! 

Time — Any Tuesday, Thursday or Saturday, during the 8th and 
9th Periods. Place — Kemistry Laboratory 

Don't fail to hear the Kupid-Krazed Kreatures render that heart- 
rending, soul-stirring song "I want a match — 
0, would I had a match !" 

Witness the most thrilling detective melo-drama in history 

"Komedian Detects Kalcium In Kampbell's Koncoctions" 

Kast of Kharacters — Kaustic Kommedian, Ruth De La Hunt ; 

Kupid-Krazed Kreatures, Alpha Stine, Doris Dinnetz, 

Kmming Krammer, Clara Bjornstead 

Biggest Hit of the Season, as sung by the Krazy Kwartet 

"I didn't raise my girl to be a Kemist 
I brot her up to be a winsome sprite 
Who dares to put a test tube in her fingers 
To mix up H 2 S both day and night ! 
Let Kampbell keep his hydrogen peroxide 
His NH 4 OH and BrO— 
There 'd be no fumes today 
Tf parents all would say 
I didn't raise my girl to be a Kemist." 

Hear Alpha in Her Vaudeville Hit "I've Got the 'Gimmies!' " 
Kampbell's Kids Kap the Klimax! Kraziest Krabs in Kaptivity! 

DON'T MISS IT 



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S>J I T C H E R 




WTzo Noess ? 



They say Anna Noess, Esther Noess and Helen N< 



So here go-es 



Who was it wrote that sweet ditty 
Beginning — "I saw from somewhere"? 
Can a man buy a cap for his knee? 
Or a key for a lock of his hair? 
What is the name of the author 
Of "she had such a beautiful face"? 
Is Lingk the missing one 
That Darwin tried to trace? 

Do North Polar fishes have feathers? 
Was Fat Brown quartered or hung? 
Where was Herb Pease cremated? 
Who was it invented the bung? 
Does Lelia Mount ever erupt? 
Where can I get some snail's horns? 
Which of the Muses played short-stop? 
Does Marjory Keck have corns? 

Has Irene Shrader four stomachs? 

Who crosses the bridge of his nose? 

Can I use in shingling the roof of my mouth 

The nails on the end of my toes? 

Tell me where Moses was buried. 

Did Noah take fleas in the ark? 

What was Eve's middle initial? 

Why is it that hens do not bark? 

Why is it Dewey's "dog" doesn't bite? 

Does Pussy-foot ever stroll out in the halls? 

Was Ellison Strand-ed while up at the Soo? 

Is Doris Dinnetz a Disciple of Paul's? 

Would a jay Cub ever harm a poor innocent Kerr? 

Why is Kartes Snow-bound though the weather is hot? 

If Kabrud dumb up on the fire escape 

Would he "climb" back down if Jennie Shott? 

What was the air Froemke fiddled? 

Do Faculty clams ever yield pearls? 

How many biles did poor Job have? 

What will cure squinting in girls? 

Does Campbell expand with the cold or the heat? 

Who was the third Pope of Rome? 

Did Milton write "We're going over"? 

Who was it said, "There was nobody home"? 



PAGE M 




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•NITCHER 




(Remarkable ^Remarks 

Miss Brendemuhl: Yes — alright — go on. 

Irene S. : Gee, Dewey, are they going to have anything to eat. 

Mae B.: Let me bounce up to that glass and fix my beastly hair. It couldn't look 
worse. 

Gladys D. : My goodness kids; I'm dying. Isn't it fierce? 

Miss Finley: When in doubt use a plain seam. 

Evelyn B. : Say kid, yuh got your geom? 

Miss Harnsberger: Now, girls, don't think I mean this for a scolding. It is merely 
to help you after you leave school. 

Emil F.: In this case, as a result of which, of course, it is my opinion that he hap- 
pened to die of "hydrofibia." 

Mr. Combellick: Yaas, you'll find it helpful in your teaching work. 

Dorothea S. : Oh dear. Well, I thot I'd die. 

Emil D. : I don't know, Why? 

Paul J.: Hello, Dorris, I got your letter. 

Beulah W. : Oh my gosh, kid, where's the lesson? I lost my book. 

Mr. Fuller: Very well — that is sufficient. 

Doris D. : Has Paul called up yet? 

Aileen T. : Kids, is Jennie coming? 

Alpha E. : (On her arrival at Ellendale) Oh, Lu, isn't this a joke? Not a taxi in 



town. 



Leonard: Vera, how would you like to have a pet monkey? 
Vera: Oh, Leonard, this is so sudden. 



TOUGH LUCK 

Mr. Ackert is my Arithmetic teacher, I shall not want. 

He maketh me to march thru the large class room, 

He leadeth me beside the long blackboard, 

He restoreth my vocabulary. 

Yea, tho I understand it not, I will fear no evil, 

For Pa Ackert is with me. 

His ruler and gentle voice comfort me. 

He prepareth a test for me without the presence of my 

Arithmetic book. 
He annointeth my paper with red ink, 
My grade runneth under. 
Surely, merely goodness and mercy shall follow all 

mathematics thru this trying year. 
But I should like to dwell out of the Arithmetic class forever. 



PAGE 87 





Sn itch er 



YeSonsgfCRe& 



Officers 

Supreme Exalted Rester — "Bat" Bdown 

Grand Chief Loafer — "Dog" Brown 

Most Worthy Sitter — Theo. Northrop 

Past Master of Quietivity — "Fat" Brown 

Keeper of the Lazy Bone — "Chug" Blumer 

Sergeant of the Hook Worm — "Shorty" Pease 

YELL 

Raw Buck — Saw Buck 
Malus labor est ; 
Liver ever — Work never 
Sons of rest. 

FLOWER 
Century Plant 

PASS WORD 
Tomorrow 



<Uhe Military Ball of 1918 

There had been much talking in the halls and every nick and corner was occupied 
I i by couples, even the most bashful ones. If one listened closely the youth could be 
heard saying, "Won't you come with me to our ball," for it had been announced that the 
Eleventh Annual Ball was to be given by Company "A." 

Q After the setting sun had thrown its lengthening shadows across the sky on the 
Li evening of March 26 the dancers assembled. The school armory which was decorat- 
ed in old gold and blue, was a sight which any one would welcome. At one end of the 
building "Old Glory," The Battalion Flag hung in all her splendor, surrounded by the 
squad streamers. At the other end was located the punch table and bowl, whose contents 
was fully enjoyed. With this as a background and the young ladies in party gowns, while 
the cadets wore their uniforms, lent a charm to the picture which no artist could 
paint. 

9 "What passion cannot music raise and quell." This statement proved itself for 
J 1 from the time the first strain of the grand march was played until the last number, 
the atmosphere was one of merriment. 

4 After dancing until eleven o'clock the guests were ushered to the Domestic Science 
1 rooms where the "inner man" was more than satisfied with the luncheon which was 
served by the young ladies. 

[J The dancers then returned and danced the remaining numbers on the program. As the 
Ji strains of "Home, Sweet Home," crept through the hall they reluctantly bade farewell 
and departed feeling that Company "A" had attained a high standard of efficiency along 
the line of entertaining. 

PAGE W 



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CHER 




A is for Anderson, 
Who daily meanders on ; 
He's chubby, but not very tall. 
Says he, "Tis no mystery 
If you want to know history 



FACULTY A. B. C.'s 

I is not in it, 

So we'd best not begin it, 

To make rhymes with this poor lonely letter. 

The Faculty don't own it, 

The students can't loan it. 



You've just got to play basketball." 

B is for Black, 

Of law does he smack, 

This head of the Normal-Industrial. 

He's never found lacking 

In tightening or slacking 

And making the Faculty hustle. 

C is for Crawford, 

To us ne'er was offered 

A registrar so very efficient. 

Any question you ask her 

It never does task her. 

Efficient, Efficient, Efficient ! 

D is for Drum, 

Who can make things hum, 

Not a major — Oh ! my, dear me, no ! 

We all have a hunch 

That to feed the Dorm bunch 

Is far from a snap — so does she know. 

E is for Earl, 

Don't let your thots whirl, 

His last name is just simply Ackert. 

All the year round 

Teaching Math, he is found, 

This accurate, apt Mr. Ackert. 

F is for Finley, 

Armed with a pin tray, 

Who teaches the girls how to sew. 

Can they trim a Spring hat 

Embroider, knit, tat? 

Oh, who in the world doesn't know ! 

G is for Gabriella, 

She'd sure flunk a fellow, 

Especially in English III. 

She couldn't know more, 

If degrees she'd a score; 

But she's seldom as stern as she can be. 

H is for Harnsberger, 

You needn't look further 

If you spell art with capital A. 

She's a preceptress too ; 

With such loads to do, 

I wonder her hair isn't grey. 



So that's why the verse is no better. 

I is for Johns, 

On all it soon dawns 

That she came to N. I. from fair Kansas. 

Not much over twenty, 

Of "Pep" she's a plenty, 

Enhanced by new tortoise shell lenses. 

K is for Keck, 

Who your ear drums won't wreck 

When she sings high lyric soprano. 

She thinks operetta giving 

Makes life worth the living; 

But public school music, Oh my, NO! 

L is for Lieiace 

For her there must be a space 

To tell of the sparkler she's flashing. 

From the looks of her finger 

In Ellendale she'll not linger, 

But be married in good orthodox fashion. 

M is for Marsh, 

Could she ever be harsh? 

Yet in the model school she's queen 

when she's once in. 
By a strange freak of fate, 
She has grades two to eight, 
And she comes from that fair state, 

Wisconsin 

N is for Natwick, 

With knowledge emphatic 

Of Home Economics and such. 

She bakes and she stews, 

She broils, but not brews, 

But her fondness for hikes beats the Dutch ! 

O is for Olin, 

Who puts his whole soul in 

The teaching of History of Ed. 

Says the Senior, hard sighing, 

"Perhaps I am dying! 

What does ail my poor aching head?" 

P is for Potts, 

Who to Aberdeen trots, 

When she wants a brief airing on Sunday. 

If that's not enough, 

She deems it the stuff 

To work the girls hard in Gym. Monday. 



PAGE 89 




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1ST I T C H E R 




Q is a queer one, 

N. I. ne'er got near one 

Who wrote that odd sign in his name. 

But since you can't find one 

Then cease to remind one, 

Or this verse may not be the same. 



U will undoubtedly 

Ne'er with us popular be, 

Until we import some outsider. 

Then why worry one wee bit, 

If all the names we can't fit? 

Let's rejoice that our circle's no wider. 



R is for Ritmiller, 

From attic to coal cellar, 

He's the N. I. head janitor, busy. 

He runs up and down 

With never a frown ; 

It's a wonder he doesn't get dizzy 

S we are satisfied 

Is not — for we really tried — 

To be found in our whole institution. 

But since that would check our speed 

Let us with due haste proceed 

To made, for that loss, restitution. 

T is for Tuttle, 

Whom tricks cannot muddle, 

Our dignified N. I. librarian. 

She'll hunt up a reference 

With all due deference, 

From Ethiopian down to the Aryan 



V must full valiantly 
Rely on alacrity 

To make good with honor alone. 
There's not e'en a Valentine 
Thruout our whole family line, 
So we'll drop it and later atone. 

W is for Willie 

But isn't that sillie? 

For there isn't a Bill — no, not at all. 

We'll just have to wait a bit 

'fill William can gravely sit 

Next to Father Combellick in Chapel. 

X, Y, Z. These poor letters three 
No owner can find on the roll. 
Then let's leave it here 
And rest without fear 

That we've done what we could tGward our 
goal. 



L'ENVOI 

May the N. I. still stand, 
A strength in our land, 
Throughout the long ages to come. 
When the last class it taught 
And the last text books bought 
Then at last will its duty be done. 

"A MISFIT" 

I sat on the steps at midnight 
But her love was not to my taste 

My reach was 36 inches 

While she had a "46" waist. 

— Kid Reager. 

WHAT INDEED 

"If Ivanhoe'd the bonny brae, 

And Athelstane'd his tunic red; 
If Friar Tucked his food away, 
Oh, what would Rhoderic Dhu?" 



SHOCKING 

Strutz having a job growing a mustache. 
Dorothy Shyrock at the dinner table: "Strutz's 



mustache iust tickles me. 



PAGE !i0 





S' NITCH ER 



(Written by a member of the Short Course English Class) 

January 25, 191 8, Mr. Short Kourse ordered a blue serge suit of clothes from Sears, 
Roebuck & Co. 

January 28, he became anxious for his suit and sent the following inquiry: 

Ellendale, N. Dak., Jan. 28, 1918 
Sears, Roebuck & Co. 
Dear Sir: 

Why don't you ship my order? 

If you don't want to sell us we will go elsewhere with our orders as our money is good 
with others, if it isn't attractive to you. 

Yours truly, 

SHORT KOURSE. 

(Reply) 
(Written by a member of the same class) 

Chicago, 111., January 31, 191 8. 
Mr. Short Kourse, 

Ellendale, N. Dak. 
Sir: 

In reply of your letter, which you were stating that you have not received the goods 
you sent for several days ago, and if we shouldent sent the goods at once, you would quit 
trading with us and sent your orders to other companies. 

We would be very much pleased if you would but before we can cansil your name in 
our books we want you to return our catalogues. 

We are more trouble with you then with 1 5 other of our customers, Who trade more 
than every three years once, and then reporting us what we have to do if we dont sent 
the goods immediately even if we havent received an Order. Hoping this will pleas you. 

Yours, 

SEARS ROEBUCK & CO. 



REAGER'S CALL AT THE DORM. 

They sing a little song 

And have a little chat, 

She makes a little candy fudge, 

And then he takes his hat; 

He holds her hand and says '"Good Night!" 

As sweetly as he can. 

Ain't that a duce of an evening 

For a great, big husky man? 

Laura had a little lamp, 
Which was well trained no doubt, 
For every time that Emil came . 
The little lamp went out. 

PAGE 91 




N rTC'HE' R 




Why Teachers Go Insane 



Shall we write on both sides of the paper?'' 

I didn't hear the question. 

What is the lesson for tomorrow, I forgot? 

Are the test papers marked yet? 

I couldn't get the book. 

Must I write this in ink? 

That is as far as I got. 

Did you say our notebooks were due today? 

I know it, but I can't express myself. 

Where is the place? 

1 studied the wrong lesson. 

Has the bell "rang"? 



® 



A Liberal Assignment 



We'll take a rest tomorrow 

There'll be no lesson in English III. 

We have worked quite hard for a month or two, 

And now are tired as we can be. 

We'll now let up on the steady grind 

For just one day tomorrow. 

But we must not get too far behind, 

We must not come to sorrow. 

While resting, we will read the lives 

Of Webster, Burke and Milton ; 

And study the biographies 

Of Tennyson and Lincoln 

We'll memorize ten paragraphs 

Of Burke's "Conciliation," 

And a couple of dozen sentences 

From the "Bunker Hill Oration." 

That time may not drag heavily, 

While taking our well earned rest. 

We'll learn a score of definitions 

And review for Friday's test. 

You know, it is quite unusual 

To let up on our work. 

So when you're studying hard again, 

Remember, do not shirk. 



PAGE !i2 




rrrs r^T^^^h. 



QiV). 



N'l/TC-H'E'R 




Faculty and Short-Horn Game 

They Play 1920 Basketball. A Thrill a Minute. Faculty Beats By One Point 

4:27 p. m. Short-horns appear amidst funeral applause. 

4:31 Little Carrie Tuttle followed by other female officiates carrying tank of water. 

4:35 Blood clogs in the veins of on-lookers. Fat Campbell, Tubby Fields, Bobby Ashley, 

Babe Brown, Slim Hathaway, Pa Black, Book Anderson and Cutie Fuller 

appear amidst thundering silence. 
4:40 Alarm clock sounds and conflict is on. 

4 145 Short-horns make a basket. The echo from Freshmen and Sophmores, "Stick 'em, 

Short Course. Every one to a man is back of you." 
4:50 Time taken out for Fat Campbell to comb his hair. 
4:57 Another serve for Short-horns. Ball oscillates between two teams, neither being 

willing to touch it. 
4:59 Time out. Bobby feels the need of nourishment and is handed a pill by Natwick 

& Marsh. 
5:10 Time called for half. Short Course in the lead. 
5:14 Second half begins. 
5:15 Overheard: "Fat couldn't make a basket if some one would give him a step 

ladder." 
5:20 Faculty making a few points after being urged by Anderson and his "Kom-oan, 

Kom-oan, get into the game." 

5 :23 Fuller falls and freezes onto the ball. 

5 125 Foul on Short-horns for holding Fat. (How we envy them.) 

5 129 Tubby hurt. He thought he had broken his leg until assured by attending phy- 
sician it is only his shoe string. 
5 130 Fuller takes time to study physiognomy. 

5 137 Bobbie and Boob with their strangle hold succeed in making Short Course sit up 
and take notice. 
Score is 9 to 10 in favor of Faculty. 
Alarm sounds and the crowd disperses. — E. J. C. 



GUESS AGAIN 

Ackert, after a prolonged silence — "Emil, are you Norwegian or Swede?' 
Emil, drousily — "Dunno, my father was Dutch." 



WE WONDER TOO 

Paul to Aaron, who is preparing to leave — "Did you get your grades?" 

Aaron — "Yes, I got everything in my trunk." 

Paul — "But your credits, did you get your credits?" 

Aaron, puzzled — "Credits, credits? What's them?" 



PRETTY INNOCENCE 



Prexy to Shorty who is up on the carpet — "Now, 
your custom to attend class without your lessons?" 
Innocent Shorty — "I was born in 1899, sir." 



Mr. Pease, how long has it been 



PAGE 93 




mssM^^*^ ^^^ZSSSSSS 



P/iz7osop/iy 

I'm the best pal that I ever had, 

I like to be with me. 

I like to sit and tell me things, 

Confidentially. 

1 often sit and ask me if 

I shouldn't or if I should 

And I find that my advice to me 

Is always pretty good. 

I never got acquainted with 

Myself till here of late — 

And I find myself a glorious chum, 

I treat me simply great. 

I often walk and talk with me, 

And tell me right from wrong; 

I never knew how well myself 

And me could get along. 

It's great to know yourself and have 

A pal that's all your own, 

To be such company for you, 

That you're never left alone. 

Then you'll try to dodge the masses, 

And you'll find the crowd a joke, 

If you treat yourself as well 

As you treat other folk. 

I've made a study of myself, 

Compared me with a lot, 

And I've finally concluded that 

I'm the best friend I've got. 

Just get together with yourself 

And trust yourself with you ; 

And you'll be surprised how much yourself 

Will like you — if you do ! 

— Dorothy Sbyrock 

THANK YOU! 

"I thank you for the flowers you sent," she said, 
And smiled and blushed and drooped her head. 

"I'm sorry for the words I spoke last night. 
Your sending flowers proved that you were right. 
Forgive me." 
He forgave. 

And as they walked and talked beneath the bowers 
He wondered who in had sent the flowers. 

Prof, (to a member of the class in Business Papers in English) — "What would you 
write if you were addressing a letter to a young lady?" 
Bat — "Its according to what you ask for." 

Prof. Ackert before an orchestra concert announced — "The gentlemen will kindly wear 
dark suits and the ladies, if you will, wear light dresses — I guess that will cover everything." 

PAGE M 




rrT\ r'l^^^h, ^^^^ r^h^i 



TsT I T C H E R 




School Notes 



SHORTHORN, OF COURSE 

Freshie — 'Did you ever take chloroform?" 
Short H. — "No, who teaches it?" 



Little 7 year old Bennie came running to his father, crying. The sympathetic father 
of two litle boys asked : 

Dad: "What's the matter, sonnie?" 

Bennie (sobbing) — "Johnny's got some candy an-an won't give me any." 

Dad (calling) — "Johnny, come here." 

Johnny (present) — "What d'ya want." 

Dad — "Johnny, you're a little pig for not giving your little brother some of that 
candy. Do you know what a pig is?" 

Johnny — "Yep." 

Dad— "What is it?" 

Johnny — "Er-re litle pig is er-er-er old hog's little boy." 



Wilbur to Mabel — "Will you go to the Lyric with me tonight?" 

Mabel — "Let's see, it would cost 15 cents apiece, wouldn't it? Well, if it's all the 
same to you, Wilbur, I'd rather have the 30c." 



All I am and hope to be 

Whence comes it save from English III? 



'Go ask Papa," the maiden said, 
But the young man knew that her Papa was dead. 
And she knew the life her Papa had led, 
So she knew that he knew what she meant when she said, 
'Go ask Papa." 



LOOKING INTO CHUG'S EXAMINATION PAPER 

Ammonia — The food of the gods. 

The Alimentary Canal is about the same length as the Erie. 

Erosion — The wearing away of dirt around ant-hills, leaving the bare holes sticking 
up out of the ground. 



Steve — "How many boys enrolled for the Spring term?' 
Cub — "Nineteen, counting Anton Swanson." 



PAGE 95 




SnI' T'C'H'E'R 




Faculty Petes Woes 

(He's up from the South; 

What a pitiful thing, little Peter is 

With his cheerless room and rueful phiz, 

On a bitter cold night, when the fierce winds blow; 

When the Earth is covered with a foot of snow, 

When his room is cold, and in shivering dread, 

He slips 'neath the sheets of his lonely bed, 

How he draws up his toes, encased in silk hose, 

May not chance to get froze; then he puffs and he blows, 

And he swears he knows no mortal on earth ever suffered such woes 

And with ah's and oh's and with limbs so disposed 

That neither his toes nor his nose may be froze, 

To his slumber he goes. In the morn when the cock crows, 

And the sun has just rose, from beneath the bed clothes 

Pops a swollen red nose; and you may suppose, 

When he hears the wind blows, and see the windows all froze, 

Why back 'neath the clothes pops Faculty Pete's nose. 

For full well he knows, if from bed he arose 

To put on his clothes, that he'd surely be froze. 

And these are only a few of his woes, 

He glanced at the clock and — "Chapel has closed." 



A Radiator Speaks 



(Main Hall) 

1 have been requested to give an account of the State Normal and Industrial School 
as it appears to me. For several years I have longed to express myself and now that the 
opportunity has been offered me I can heartily say I am glad of the honor. Some may 
consider me a big piece of iron, existing merely to supply warmth and comfort, that the 
rising generation may acquire an education, but that is not all of the truth. I have feelings, 
emotions, and ambitions as well as any one. I have a fairly good education, I can speak 
English and snatches of Latin and German. 

I am a selfmade radiator and by being alert, and absorbing the little hints of 
knowledge that fall my way, 1 have plowed my way to popularity. I know I am popu- 
lar. How do I know? Is there anyone that is attending N. I. that does not pay me some 
attention? I know it isn't all on account of the heat that I am able to furnish. I am safe 
in saying that a good share of the students confide in me- — yes, more than they do in their 
faculty advisors. I hope this won't arouse jealousy or prejudice on the part of our most 
highly esteemed faculty, as I am trustworthy and will not betray the secrets that have 
been left with me, except to say that it is by my side that many battles have been fought 
and won in love and friendship. Sometimes I would blush or chuckle softly. I have listened 
to plots and plans, until I believe I could write a book full, and the students still love me. 
I know it. Sometimes they almost overcome me with affection, fighting and shoving to be 
near me. And I love them. I love the school. I am sure I am the most popular radiator 
in the school. I hope I always shall be until my death. I love to see the new students 
coming each year and always welcome all the older students that loved me in years gone 
by. I shall go on living and learning as long as I am permitted to. — /. S. 



PAGE 




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PAGE 9; 




■ ■ ■ f 1 . f . ^ r i t 1 » -± M ( » Lr*°*\ ./I1 ~^ > ] .M If /, 




Extra! Extra! 



We wish to announce early that to those looking for information concerning our 
most up to date course will find it on page twenty-six of the new catalog. We wish to 
state that the Normal and Industrial is the only place on earth that a student has such a 
grand opportunity of developing his talents along these lines; so shall proceed to give the 
fundamental principles : 

FIRST YEAR 

FUNDAMENTALS OF FUSSING 

Consists of sitting in Dormitory parlor never later than ten p. m. The weather of 
yesterday is discussed and that of tomorrow prognosticated. 
Fees $1.00. 
Instructor for this year, Victor Young. 

SECOND YEAR 

The course is a continuation and variation of first year. (A tip to the ladies on the 
side lines.) We advise the ladies to joint third year Gym. This, with the aid of the 
sunny disposition of Miss Potts' smile and hair, will enable them to trip the light fan- 
tastic without humiliation. At this stage they allowed to attend the basketball games, etc. 

We believe this is worth $2.50. 

Instructor well suited to fill position. Second Year, Gloy Sullivan. 

THIRD YEAR 
ADVANCED FUSSING 

They are allowed to attend all athletic contests and term dances, (a special request 
of Miss Tuttle's.) We deemed it necessary, seeing social duties would be crowning our 
junior members, to require a party dress and evening suit. We advise the ladies to get 
the latest, that which is made up of a large quantity of talcum powder, smiles, nerve, a 
wrist watch and little drapes of ruffles and lace. The gentlemen will find khaki more 
becoming to the eyes of the LADY THAN THOSE SUITS belonging to Co. A. 

Fees, $6.42. 

Instructor, Post Graduate Arthur Strutz. 

FOURTH YEAR 
EXPERT FUSSING 

To some extent it is a review of former years. Dates every night, (Dormitory girls 
will find those in the package are easily secured and not dangerous.) Special attention 
is given to letter writing, private speaking. Each member is required to write a thesis on 
"Cases I Have Known and Had." Last but not least, every one is made to come forward 
and at the last chapel hour announce her engagement. 

Fees only $9.99. 

Instructor, Member of Faculty, Gabriella Brendemuhl. 

P. S. — Faculty members may enroll if they pledge themselves to live up to the rules. 
Any one completing this course will receive the degree of B. S. — E. J. C. 



PAGE 98 




S'N'IT'C 'H'E'R 




"TTie Censors 



1 > 



Old Prof. Campbell was talking last night 

Of things which were wrong and must be set right, 

And he said, that with half of an organ of sight, 

It was easy to see the propriety 
Of making a thorough, complete reformation, 
A wonderful, Snitcher regeneration, 
A change which should strike to the heart of the nation, 

And alter the tone of society. 

Miss Natwick said the Snitcher, like sugar and gold, 

Had risen so high that the worth was untold, 

But the law had been shattered, and the gray matter sold 

For a price that was scarcely worth mention, 
That while precious metals a premium gained, 
More precious devotion and honor unstained 
All over the school at a discount remained 

And still are our brains on the declension. 

Now it will not surprise you, that Montgomery's tone 
So loud and excited, and angry had grown 
While she the sad state of the Snitcher had shown 

That the faculty committee gathered round her; 
For if this of our speakers, in populous towns, 
Should test the enjoyment of rustics and clowns 
At the linking of verbs, prepositions and nouns 

It would awe if it did not confound her. 

Ever since the light footsteps of Eden's fair queen 
Pressed the rich velvet turf and the blossoms between, 
As she passed to the tree that stood fragrant and green, 

With its fruitage of good and of evil, 
When we hear a man talking by day or by night, 
Be the theme of his prophecy weighty or light, 
We thirst for a knowledge of wrong and of right, 

Like Eve, in the garden primeval. 

Mr. Ashley, encouraged by borrowed applause, 
Went on to explain how the national laws 
Might act as a pressure to lower the cause, 

Instead of a lever to raise it; 
How discord and violence, hatred and crime, 
Might weaken our book in the strength of its prime, 
Might darken the light of its glory sublime, 

And make it an insult to praise it. 

But something was wanting in Ashley's speech, 
While he earnestly sought these grand lessons to teach, 
It puzzled the staff, whom his warning did reach, 

Though they felt it a sin to surpress ; 
For, while they thus talked of this grand reformation, 
This wonderful, absolute regeneration, 
This change that would strike to the heart of the nation, 

Why, the book, — it had gone to the press! 



PAGE 99 



CAlumni ^Divectov^f 

CLASS OP 100] 

Minnie Fait — Mrs. Evan Feathers Monango, X. I >. 

Flora Millham — Mrs. It. L. Irwin Venice, Calif. 

Ina Randall — Mrs. Fred Graham Ellendale, X. D, 

class of 1002 

Margaret Crowley — Mrs. I'. O. Deck V.naconda, Mont. 

Lily DeGraff — Mrs. Reeves Vancouver, Wash. 

Walter Fait — Farmer Monango, X. I). 

Fred Graham — Attorney at Law Ellendale, X. I >. 

Katie Haas — Teacher Linton, X. I >. 

Gustava Hukari — Mrs. Casper Nygaard Hollister, Idaho 

Maude Letson — Mrs. J. Fountain — Deceased. 
Beth Northrup — Deceased. 

Josie Northrup — Mrs. Frank Luther Monango, X. D. 

AVinnie Peek — Mrs. Samuel Ratekin Lihby, Mont. 

Arthur Webb — Farmer and Mechanical Engineer Merricourt, X. D. 

Lulu Webb — Mrs. C. D. Hagee Jamestown, X T . D. 

(LASS OF 1003 

Claude Altar — Electrician, U. of AVash Seattle, AVash. 

Curtis Carmen — Teacher Duluth, Minn. 

Fannie Crary — Mrs. Geo. Sears Ellendale, X. D. 

Mary Fleming-ton — Mrs. A. C. Strand Ellendale, X. D. 

Theresa King — Mrs. Percy MacTaggart . St. Louis, Mo. 

Ava Randall — Mercantile Business Ellendale, X. D. 

CLASS OF 1004 

Florence Burnham — Mrs. Robert Howell Frederick, S. D. 

Lauren Coleman — Dentist % . Ellendale, X. D. 

Ralph A. Holte — Cashier Bank of Stanfield Stanfield, Ore. 

Margaret Howell — Mrs. Dickey Frederick, S. D. 

L. Blanche Irwin — Real Estate Pasadena, Calif. 

Georgia Anna Ling — Mrs' R. A. Holte Stanfield. Ore. 

Silas G. Malroy — Instructor in Manual Training 616 22nd Street, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Mary McDonald — Mrs. French — Deceased. 

Harold Meachen — Mechanic — Ellendale, N. D. 

Leta Merrifield — Mrs. E. Golden Terry, Mont. 

Florence Patton — Mrs. W. P. McQuire St. Paul, Minn. 

Pearl Morey — Mrs. John Johnson Bismarck, N. D. 

Laura M. Pazandak — Mrs. James Tucker Minneapolis, Minn. 

Lulu Smith — Mrs. E. E. Saunders Okotako, Alberta, Canada 

Rene Smith — Instructor of Manual Training AVest Superior, AVis. 

Florence Van Meter — Mrs. Art Webb Merricourt, N. D. 

CLASS OF 1005 

Fred Rudolph Applequist — Farmer Fullerton, N. D. 

Robert Barnard — Western Electric Co 1327 South U. Ave., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Laura Barnes — Mrs. Geo. A. Johnson Hysham, Mont. 

Hannah Bjornstad — Mrs. A. G. Maerchlein Ellendale, N. D. 

Florence Chamberlain — Teacher, Morrison Public School Frederick, S. D. 

Arch Charles Dada — Merchant Forman, X T . D. 

Maud Harriet Dada — Mrs. Mackay Forman, N. D. 

Mae Gordon — Mrs. O. C. Freiss Verona, N. D. 

Jennie Johannsen — Mrs. W. Ravenstien Kinley, Sask., Can. 

Floyd Keeler — Deceased. 

Harriet E. Lane — Mrs. Bert Russel — Northwestern Kindergarten College 

Chicago, Illinois 

Eva Leiby — Mrs. Leslie Milham Santa Paula, Calif. 

Ava Mock — Mrs. Art Steinacker Venturia, N. D. 

Edith Saunders — Mrs. AV. McCoy Guelph, N. D. 

CLASS OF 1006 

Nina Maker — Mrs. A. C. Hargrave Anaheim, Calif. 

Elizabeth Chesley — Teacher Fargo, N. .D. 

Florence Cartrite — Mrs. L. Golden Monango, N. D. 

Emily Covert — Nurse in Service. 

Aina Hukari — Teacher - Hollister, Idaho 

Ruth Hukari — Deceased. 

Edith .Jones Los Angeles, Calif. 

Cordelia Kennedy — Mrs. Thomas Bachelor Forest Lake, Minn. 

Miss Percy Mallory — Mrs. Sweet - Los Angeles, Calif. 

Edgar Merrifield — Instructor Manual Training Minneapolis, Minn. 

Ella Itosf — Mrs. David Lane - Ellendale, N. D. 

Adel Sefton — Mrs. Earl Hughes New Rockford, N. D. 

Paul Stanton — Instructor of Manual Training Miles City, Mont. 

(LASS OF 1007 

John Ktenouist — Teacher New York City, N. Y. 

Jay St. John — Postal Service , Ellendale, N. D. 



PAGE 100 




-CO£2- 



HER 




CLASS OF 190S 

Frank Bentley — Mining- Engineer Mullen, Idaho 

Marion Cortrite — Teacher Monango, N. D. 

Helen Dean — Teacher, U. of Wisconsin Madison, Wis. 

Harriett Edgerley — Teacher Towner, N. D. 

Edwin P. Fait — Instructor Manual Training Kalispell, Mont. 

.lames Lane — Teacher Manual Training Snohomish, Wash. 

Lucy Green — Mrs. Wiley Hotchkiss Chicago, 111. 

AVill Hechlesmiller — Merchant Ellendale, N. D. 

Mae Holte Muskegon, Mich. 

Alpha Holte — Mrs. Herbert Daub .. East Chicago, 111. 

Albeit T. Johnson — Farmer Cut Bank, Mont. 

Mary King — Teacher-, Librarian Morris, Minn. 

James Lane — Teacher Manual Training .. Snohomisk, Wash. 

Ted Lee — Implement Business Fullerton, N. D. 

Rose O'Connell — Mrs. Earl Van Horn Morris, Mont. 

Ethel O'Dell — Mrs. L. A. Runestrand Hunter, N. D. 

Sadie Olson — Mrs. Wilbur Wilkinson Auburn, Neb. 

Pearl Randall — Mrs. Vern Coleman Ellendale, N. D. 

Beatrice Sefton — Teacher Jamestown, N. D. 

Ameda Senn — Mrs. Harry Wilmenson Mcintosh, S. D. 

Stella Stoddard — Milliner Muir, Mich. 

Reese Walker — In Service. 

CLASS OF 1909 

Ina Bentley — Teacher, Domestic Science Mullen, Idaho 

Maude Barnes — Mrs. F. Blumer Ellendale, N. D. 

Basil Barnes — Farmer Fullerton, N. D. 

Blanche Bjornstad — Mrs. Ed. Pehl Ellendale, N. D. 

Eddice Colwell — Mrs. Joseph King Edgeley, N. D. 

Edward Dales — Instructor M. T Spokane, Wash. 

Imogene Dunton — Teacher _ Red Oak, Iowa 

Helen Dean — Teacher Madison, Wis. 

Margaret Issac ~ Oakland, Calif. 

Iza Martin — Mrs. Bristol Monango, N. D. 

Mabel McComish Stanfield, Ore. 

Ford North — Mgr. Furniture Floor 2564 S. 3rd East St., Salt Lake City, Utah 

Edward Porter — Lieut, in U. S. Cavalry. 

Lois Shepard — Teacher Domestic Science Puyallup, Wash. 

Bertha Weber — At Home Forbes, N. D. 

Lulu Wilson — Mrs. Le Delle Briggle Oakes, N. D. 

CLASS OF 1910 

Mabel Beggs — Mrs. Lester Briley Ellendale, N. D. 

Mable Burke — Instructor Domestic Science 517 John St., Appelton, Wis. 

Ralph Bunker — In Business Roundup, Mont. 

Howard Barnes — A. E. F., France. 

William Barrett ~ — -- Scout Lake, Sask., Canada 

Waldron Bush — Instructor M. T Kent, Wash. 

Josie Bloom — Mrs. J. B. Durand Ellendale, N. D. 

Ida May Bach — At Home Edgeley, N. D. 

Ina Bentley — Teacher - Mullen, Idaho 

Emma Blumer — Mrs. Clyde Campbell Fredrick, S. D. 

Edwin Canfield — Farmer Fullerton, N. D. 

Caroline Canfield — Teacher Oakes, N. D. 

Ralph Cartwright — Teacher Republic, Wash. 

Jessie Dawe — Mrs. Sam Kabrud - Aberdeen, S. D. 

Nellie Dawe — Mrs. Edward Dales .2525 W. Sinto Avenue, Spokane, Wash. 

Clara Dobler — Mrs. Fred Buscher Mowbrany, N. D. 

Pansy E. Full — Teacher Puyallup, Wash. 

Clara Flemington — Teacher - Madison, S. D. 

Mary Hohwegler — Mrs. F. E. Green Fullerton, N. D. 

Leander King — In Service. 

Clvde McCormick — Capt. in U. S. Army. 

Leona Newton — Dept. Supt. of Schools Ellendale, N. D. 

Ruth O'Dell— Teacher Fairbury, Neb. 

Mamie A. Pazandak — Teacher State of Washington 

Mabel Porrier — Mrs. Deeval Horace, N. D. 

Elizabeth Rehberg — Mrs. Wm. Fleming — .. Ellendale, N. D. 

Margaret Rehberg — Teacher Montpelier, N. D. 

E. P. Saunders — Instructor M. T - Anacortes, Wash. 

Leah Teichmann — Mrs. Kipp Pollock, N. D. 

Neva Teichmann — At Home Fullerton, N. D. 

Irene Wippich — Deceased. 
Stella Wattles — Deceased. 

CLASS OF 3911 

Blanche Bjornstad— Mrs. Ed. Pehl Ellendale, N. D. 

May Daulton Pierre, S. D. 

Vernie Davis — Mrs. Ross Hutsinpiller Upland, ind. 

Glenn V. Dill— In Bank -- Oakes, N. D. 

Imogene Dunton — Teacher Red Oak, Iowa 

Mamie Eiden — Mrs. Wm. Boom Ellendale, N. D. 

Emma Farrand— Mrs. W. C. Gray Carrington, N. D. 



PAGE 101 




&^& 



s'.Hv , , rfvt 



I T C H E R 



■ mh$"°2im^'Ji 




Adah Flemington Spencer Iowa 

Mabel Geer — Mrs. I). Crabtree Ellendale, X. D. 

Herbert Goddard — Editor Ellendale, X. D. 

Ross Hutsinpiller — Student of Taylor U Upland, Ind. 

Caston Herbert — Teacher Ellendale, X. I >. 

Ruth Kellog — Teacher Hettinger, X. D. 

Lucille Knapp — Mrs. Ralph Bunker Roundup, .Mom 

Howard Letson — IT. S. Army. 

Lloyd Marsh — Student University Berkley, Calif. 

Laura McCulloch — U. of N. I) Grand Forks, X. D. 

Glenn Morrison — Civilian Service Mare island, Cal. 



Morgan — Teacher of Domestic Science Metnor, X. I>. 



Ellendale, X. D. 



.Jos 

Mary Mills — Teacher Pisek, X. I). 

Eifie Myers — Teacher' Guelph, X. I >. 

Osa Olmstad — Mrs. E. Morgan 

Leigh Porter — Aviator in Flying Corps. 

Lola Prevey — Teacher Napoleon, X. D. 

Bersha Peek — At Home Ellendale, X. I). 

Albert Shimmin — U. S. Army. 

Willam Shimmin — instructor M. T Snohomish, Wash. 

Elmer' Thompson — Student of University Berkley, f'alif. 

Glaus Tomren Chariton, Iowa 

Clarence Tracey — Principal of High School Columbus. X. 1 >. 

Harriet Van Meter — Deceased. 
Lorenzo Zeigier — IT. S. Aim. v. 

Harry Wallace — Private Secretary .Judge Wickersham Ellendale, X. D. 

P. E. Erickson — Instructor M. T Mcintosh, X. D. 

La Delle Briggle, Banker Oakes, X. D. 

CLASS OF 1912 

Grace Axtell — Student of Columbia IT New York City, X T . Y. 

Minnie Blumer — At Home Ellendale, N. D. 

G. W. Bloomquist — Teacher- of Commercial Fargo, X. D. 

Myrtle Ball — At Home Verdon, S. D. 

Ruth Beggs — Mrs. Hugh McGraw San Bernardino, Calif. 

Barbara Barnes — Stenographer .. Fargo. X. D. 

Mattie Crabtree — County Supt. of Schools Ellendale, X. D. 

Lucille Crabtree — Mrs. L. Coleman Ellendale, X. D. 

Lelah Coleman — In Bank Ellendale, N. D. 

Berdie Case — Ohio AVesleyan IT. Delaware, Ohio 

Odah Dicky — Mrs. Walter Heekelsmiller Ellendale, N. D. 

Jessie Dawe — Mrs. Sam Kabrud Aberdeen, S. D. 

Nellie Dawe — Mrs. Ed. Dales Spokane, Wash. 

Mamie Eiden — Mrs. Wm. Boom Ellendale, N. I). 

Wilma Ernest — Mrs. Dan Saurey Columbia Falls, Mont. 

Robert Earnest — Instructor M. T. Bothwell, Wash. 

Adah Flemington — Teacher of History Spencer, Iowa 

Iva Green — Mrs. D. J. W. Murdock Waterville, Wash. 

George Hargrave — Instructor M. T. Finte, N. D. 

Carl Hogan — Teacher. 

Katie Haas — Teacher Linton, N. D. 

Josephine Harvey — Teacher Benson, Minn. 

Ruth Kellog — Teacher Hettinger, N. D. 

Armond La Berge Good Land, Kan. 

John Laemmle — U. S. Service, Camp Dodge. 

Ruth Leiby — Teacher Ellendale, N. D. 

Howard Letson — U. S. Army. 

Laura McCulloch — Student of TT. of N. D Grand Forks, N. D. 

Hugh McGraw — Instructor M. T. San Bernardino, Calif. 

Gladys McMartin 

Josephine Morgan — Teacher Milnor, N. D. 

Dan McDonald — In Service. 
Thomas McDonald — In Service. 

Etta Miller Ellendale, N. I). 

George Misfeldt — In Service. 

Glenn Morrison, Civilian Service -- Mare Island, Calif. 

Howard Morrison, In Service. 
Kathryn Reedy — Teacher in S. D. 

Ruth Rouse — Teacher Guelph, N. D. 

Maude Shimmin — Mrs. Gordon Wilson ... Forbes, N. P 

Ellen Shimmin — Teacher Forbes, N. 1 >. 

Albert Shimmin — In Service. 

Blanche Saunders — Teacher Sanburn, N. 1). 

Elmer Thompson — Student BerLley, Calif. 

Grace Van Meter — Teacher Drescoll, N. D. 

Mamie WiNon — Teacher Thief River' Falls, Minn. 

K:-t ella Williams — Deceased. 

Bessie Willis — Mrs. George Hargrave Pinte, N. D. 

CLASS OF 1913 

Ida Baumbach Mrs. Will Benedick Glover, N. D. 

Clell Bentley -In Service. 

Joseph P.entley- -In Service. 

Lucy A. Bowler — Stenographer Aberdeen, S. D. 



PAGE 102 




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^^£ra2£ES232I 




.Joseph I'.oyd — In Service. 

Viola Boyd— Mrs. Wilson Savo, N.' D. 

Edwin M. Canfield — Farmer Fullerton, N. D. 

Leah E. Coleman — In Bank Ellendale, N. D. 

Bernice E. Dada — Mrs. Emmet McGraw Forman, N. D. 

Cressey M. Dean — Mrs. John Bentley Watertown, S. D. 

Elga O. Carlson — Teacher Wetonka, N. D. 

Tacey B. Fleming- — Mrs. (/has. Hulstead Cloverton, Minn. 

Ruth M. Haas — Assist. Music Teacher at S. N. I. S .... Ellendale, N. D. 

Lillian A. Harm — Teacher Guelph, N. D. 

Howard C. Holte — In Business Ellendale, N. D. 

Mae Kaven — Teacher Rutland, N. D. 

Anna Kellog — Student A. C Fargo, N. D. 

Ruth C. Leiby — Teacher in Public School Ellendale, N. D. 

A. C. Malin — Instructor M. T Leeds, N. D. 

Thomas McDonald — In Service. 

Cecil McPherson — Mrs. W. K. DeLaHunt Sheldon, N. D. 

Gertrude E. Merklein — Teacher Tyndall, S. D. 

Opal Montague — Mrs. T. L. Broulliard Ellendale, N. D. 

N. Belle Morey — Mrs. Hoffner Lameer, Wyo. 

Lloyd Meyers — Teacher Ellensburg, Wash. 

Leona I. Newton — Dep. Co. Supt Ellendale, N. D. 

Blanche Saunders — Teacher Sanburn, N. D. 

Irma Shepard — Student at S. N. I. S Ellendale, N. D. 

Linvil Townsend — Farmer Ludden, N. D. 

James C. Vandanacker — Farmer Ellendale, N. D. 

Lyall A. Willis — In Service. 

Mamie Wilson — Teacher Thief River Falls, Minn. 

Pearl Zimmerman — Teacher Noonan, _N„ TX 

CLASS OF 1914 

Eva Z. Anderson — Mrs. Ralph Walters Fullerton, N. D. 

Lucy A. Bowler — Stenographer Aberdeen, S. D. 

Mary J. Case — Ohio Wesleyan U Delaware, Ohio 

Ralph G. Cartwright — Teacher Republic, Wash. 

Charlotte P. Carr — At Home Sheldon, N. D. 

Mildred I. Crabtree — Teacher Outlook, Mont. 

Augustina Dobler — Teacher ~ Kulm, N. D. 

Walter DeLaHunt — Teacher Sheldon, N. D. 

Marie Guldberg — Teacher - Montana 

Maud Holte — At Home - ~ Ellendale, N. D. 

Alice Vera Higgs — Mrs. Pazandak Fullerton, N. D. 

Ruth M. Haas — Assist. Music Teacher at S. N. I. S Ellendale, N. D. 

Oliver Halsted — Driver of School Wagon Cloverton, N. D. 

Charles Halsted — Bookkeeper Cloverton, N. D. 

Mabel B. Geer — Mrs. D. W. Crabtree Ellendale, N. D. 

Martha Kalbus — At Home Ellendale, N. D. 

Thoralf H. Koppang — Deceased. 

Claud Arthur Lawhead — Teacher Taylor, N. D. 

Silas A. McCulloch— Farmer Edgeley, X. D. 

Lloyd E. Myers — Teacher in High School Ellensburg, Wash. 

Ester A. McMartin — Mrs. Leslie Estoughenberg Edgeley, N. D. 

Edythe M. Merchant — Teacher Forbes, N. D. 

T. Clvde McCormick — Capt. in U. S. Army. 

Lillian G. McGinnis — Postmaster Ellendale, N. D. 

Katherine D. Pollock — Student of U. of N. D Grand Forks, N. D. 

H. Preston Porter — At Home ~ - Ellendale, N. D. 

Laura E. Potter — In Postoffice Minot, X. D. 

Daniel McDonald — In Service. 

Laura M. Randall— Teacher Ludden, N. D. 

Mabel Stafsburg — Student Taylor F - Upland, Ind. 

Clara Stafsburg — Teacher Edgeley, N. D. 

Edna Stafsburg — Student Taylor U - Upland, Ind. 

Ethel E. Saunders — Teacher Sanburn, N. D. 

Blanche X. Saunders — Teacher - Sanburn, N. D. 

Charles Stahl — Instructor M. T - - Menominee, Mich. 

Edna Smith Ellendale, N. D. 

Linvill C Townsend — Farmer ~ ~ Ludden, N. D. 

Frances M. Walton — Student U. of Wis Madison, Wis. 

Winifred I. Wagner — Mrs. W. Norton Guelph, N. D. 

Irene M Webb — Clerk in Store Ellendale, N. D. 

Frances L. AValker — Teacher of Music in H. S Crookston, Minn. 

CLASS OF 1915 

Frances Leon Abraham — Farmer Ellendale, N. D. 

Bertha Barnes — Teacher Ellendale, N. D. 

Regina Bakke Kenyon, Minn. 

Clara Josephine Bjornstad — Student ----- .... Ellendale, N. D. 

Julia Wilson Briggle - Oakes, N. D. 

Daisy Brown — Kindergarten Teacher Ellendale, N. D. 

Frances Leota Boom — Stenographer Ellendale, N. D. 

Irma Lucille Connor — Teacher New England, N. D. 

Marion L. Cortrite — Teacher Monango, N. D. 

Frank Callan — In Service 



PAGE 103 




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Meri I. Comstock Studenl of U. of Wisconsin Madiaon, Wis. 

Bernice E, Dada -Mrs. Emmel McGraw Forman, X. D. 

John Dawe — III Service 

Dorothy Stephenson Deane U. of in LJrbana, Illinois 

Richard .John Gamble — Teacher of M. r r Larimore, X. I >. 

William Ashton Gamble — In Service. 

Sceone Estella Eichinger — Teacher Filmore, X. D. 

Nellie W. Ernesl —Mrs. Fred Bowerman Fullerton, X. D. 

Newell Fowler — Teacher L130 8th St., Anacortes, Wash. 

Marion Agnes Fleming — Teacher vVishek, X. I >. 

Clara Rosina Hess — Teacher Towner, X. \>. 

Alice Vera Higgs — Mrs. Pazandac Fullerton X. D. 

Myrtle Alice Hill — Teacher Ellendale, X. D. 

Emma Hollan — Student of the C of N. I) Grand Forks, X. D. 

Nellie Howard — Teacher Ellendale, X. D. 

Irra 1 1 u tsinpiller — Teacher Lamoure, X. D. 

Maud Marion Holte — At Home Ellendale, X. D. 

Jay Allen Harm — In Service. 
John Kosel — In Service. 

Beatrice Harriet Keagle — Teacher Winship, X. D. 

.loycelyn Lane Kellog — Nat'l Kindergarten College Chicago, 111. 

John Laemmle — In Service. 

Hulda Lang- — Student of U. of N. D Grand Forks, X. D. 

Mary Lola Laughlin — Teacher- Monango, X. I >. 

Gertrude Merklein — Teacher Tvndall, S. I >. 

Donald McCormick— Student of U. of N. 1) Grand Forks, X. I). 

William C. McCulloch — Farmer- Edgeley, X. I). 

Edythe Mae Merchant — Teacher Forbes, N. D. 

Emmet Francis McGraw- — -In Service. 

A. C. Malin — Instructor M. T Leeds, X. D. 

Ralph Oertle — Post Graduate Ellendale, X. D. 

Laura E. Potter — Postoffice Minot. X. D. 

Hector Porter — In Service. 

Hazel Evelyn Randall — Student North Western University Evanston, 111. 

Vera Laurette Schrader — Mrs. Baldwin Ludden, N. D. 

Dorothy Mae Smith — Teacher Ellendale, N. D. 

Lulu May Thompson — Teacher Kenmare, N. D. 

Katherine Pollock — Student of U. of N. D Grand Forks, N. D. 

Frances Mary Turnam — Teacher Wishek, X. I). 

Marguerite Wyckoff — Teacher , Monango, N. D. 

CLASS OF 1916 
Gladys Ayres. 
Mattie Ayres. 

Francis K. Baker- — Teacher Hazelton, 

Orvis Banks — In Business, Clerk Ellendale, 

Belva Barnes — Teacher Fullerton, 

Mildred Bjornstead — Teacher Kenmare, 

Francis L. Boom — Stenographer- Ellendale, 

Floyd Brown — In Service. 

Carrie Callan — Student N. I Ellendale, 

Preston Coleman — Teacher M. T Kenmare, 

Mabel Col well — Teacher Hazelton, 

Angelina Cook — Teacher Ellendale, 

John Dawe — In Service. 

Muriel Dunton — In Business Ellendale, N. D. 

Stanley J. Fleming — A. E. F., France. 

Richard Gamble — Teacher- M. T Larimore, N. D. 

Wm. A. Gamble — In Service. 

Dorothy Harvey Gamble Larimore, 

Edna Mae Harris — Teacher in H. S Dickinson, 

Edna Hatfield — Teacher Ellendale, 

Ruth Hay — Teacher Revillo, 

Bessie Campbell Johnson — Teacher. 

Cora Kabrud— Teacher Forbes, 

Elsie Kalbus — At Home Ellendale, 

Bertha Viola Knox — Teacher Monango, 

Agnes Leverty — Teacher Oakes, 

Irene L. Ludwig — Teacher Chokio, 

Gene McGraw — In P. O. in Cogswell Cogswell, 

Millie McGraw — Teacher Shoshone, 

James L. Meachen — In Service. 

Aida Dewey Miller — Teacher Fullerton, 

Lulu Noess — Teacher Ellendale, 

Ada L. Olson — Teacher Kenmare, 

Herbert C. Peek — In Service. 

Clara Peterson Crosby, 

Ella Theresa Podoll — Teacher Jud, 

Paul H. Rehberg — Teacher M. T Ronan, 

Walter L. Saunders — Clerk .Auditor's Office Ellendale, 

Dorothy M. Smith — Teacher, High School Ellendale, 

Frederick Smith-Peterson — Tacher M. T Grand Rapids, 

Arthur George Strut/. — In Service. 

Olive May Sullivan— Teacher Ellendale, N. D. 



N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 



N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


S. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


Mi 


nn. 


N. 


D. 


Idf 


iho 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


D. 


Mont. 


N. 


D. 


N. 


1). 


Minn. 



PAGE 104 




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Everett a. Thrams — In Service. 

Mil am V. Ward — Teacher M. T Benson, Arizona 

Mamie Weber — Teacher Forbes, N. D. 

Ruth Weber — Teacher Forbes, N. D. 

Eber Welcher — In Service. 

Adria H. Williams — County Supt Steele, N. D. 

Beulah Williams— Student Ellendale, N. D. 

Helen Wilson — Teacher Braddock, N. D. 

CLASS OF 1917 

Fred Ackerman — In Service. 

Ceryl E. Black — Hamlin College St. Paul, Minn. 

Herbert Brown — Teacher, S. N. I. S Ellendale, N. D. 

Leslie C. Casbon — In Service U. S. Army 

Helen Coleman, Teacher, Sargent Co Crete, N. D. 

H. Preston Coleman — Teacher M. T Kenmare, N. D. 

Hazel Fern Crandall, Teacher, Dickey Co. Fullerton, N. D. 

Gladys M. Dawe— Post Graduate Student of S. N. I. S Ellendale, N. S. 

Stanley Fleming, In Service A. E. F., France 

Clayton D. Geer — Banking Ellendale, N. D. 

Gladys G. Graham — Teacher, Dickey Co Glover, N. D. 

Anna M. Hermansen — Teacher, Dickey Co Ellendale, N. D. 

Agnes Johanson, Teacher, Dickey Co Ellendale, N. D. 

Fred G. Leasure — Principal of Consolidated School Verona, N. D. 

Thomas A. Lee — In Service A. E. F., France 

Llewllyn R. Lynde, Auto Mechanic Ellendale, N. D. 

Orrin Lynde, Student U. of Minn Minneapolis, Minn. 

Elizabeth J. McConville — Teacher, McPearson Co., S. D Forbes, N. D. 

Aida Dewey Miller, Teacher, Dickey Co Ellendale, N. D. 

Ira S. Morgans, Teacher M. T - Republic, Wash. 

Jennie E. Nelson, Post Graduate Student S. N. I. S Ellendale, N. D. 

Nettie Norris — Mrs Fred G. Leasure — Teacher Verona, N. D. 

Le Roy A. Pease — Farmer Stirum, N. D. 

Fritz B. Pederson, Prin. of Schools Maddock, N. D. 

Paul H. Rheberg — Teacher M. T Ronan, Mont. 

Charles Smith — Government Observatory Ellendale, N. D. 

Anna Tscetter — Teacher Venturia, N. D. 

Fred Walz — In Service Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Hillia Wattula — Teacher, Dickey Co. Ludden, N. D. 

Donna Welcher, Student U, of Iowa Iowa City, Iowa 

Lewis Williams — Farmer Ellendale, N. D. 

Ernest G. Wood — Teacher, Dickey Co Forbes, N. D. 

Harold H. Zieman — Farmer Oakes, N. D. 




PAGE 105 




SWITCHER 




State Normal and Industrial School 

ELLENDALE, NORTH DAKOTA 

A state institution of high rank maintained for the purpose of training 
teachers for the public schools and also to train those who wish the industrial 
courses. This school has been characterized by strong manual training courses 
from the very first. These courses are given in some of the most completely 
equipped shops in the northwest. Graduates from the manual training course 
are occupying positions of high rank in this and other states. 

In home economics, strong courses are offered for young ladies who wish to 
prepare to teach this subject and also a strong course for those who wish to take 
the vocational side of this training. 

Teachers of these special courses are in strong demand and the graduates of 
the State Normal and Industrial School are not only prepared to teach these 
special subjects but general school subjects as well. 

The normal department of the school is prepared to give the four year normal 
course or one year for high school graduates and the advanced or two year course 
for high school graduates or five year course. Graduates of either are en- 
titled to a second grade professional certificate. The diploma from these courses 
is recognized in other states as a diploma from a standard normal. 

In the academic department, courses are maintained offering opportunity 
for those who have not completed a high school course to make preparation for 
entering the advanced course. 

Short courses, training the young men for gas and steam engineering and 
the young women for dressmaking and household arts, are offered in the winter 
terms. A student can be at home the busy part of the year and secure this 
training by attending the winter terms. 

A strong commercial course is maintained which would fit a student for 
office work in bookkeeping or stenography or both. 

A thoro course in elementary agriculture is given as a part of the course or 
may be taken as an elective. For this course the school is well equipped with 
laboratories, a school garden for demonstration plats, farm fields and live stock 
for study of agricultural problems. 

Strong courses in physical education are offered and given in such a way 
as to strengthen and cultivate the physical powers of the body. Athletic teams 
compete in interscholastic contests and tournaments are held. 

The school maintains a summer session of six weeks in which special 
opportunity is given to those who wish to prepare for teaching or who wish to 
take studies which will apply on the regular course. For the summer of 1 9 1 8 the 
entire plant is at the disposal of the summer school students and the shops and 
laboratories will be open. 

Eight buildings on a beautiful campus with modern conveniences, a splen- 
did city and good school spirit offer added inducements. Expenses are the lowest 
consistent with good standards of living. 

This book is an attempt on the part of the students to feature some special 
parts of school life and in a way interpret the spirit of the school. Are you look- 
ing for a school to attend or have you some member of the family who shuold 
attend a first class normal or industrial school? You are invited to learn more 
of the school by writing freely for catalog and bulletins. A copy of the catalog or 
other information may be had for the asking. 

FALL TERM OPENS OCTOBER 1, 1918 
R. M. BLACK, President 



PAGE L06 




NITCHER 




"Integrity of the Salzev Policy" 

It means HONESTY, UPRIGHTNESS, SQUARE DEALING 
Washington Fir - Idaho White Pine 

LUMBER 

DIRECT FROM THE BEST MILLS TO YOU 
Call and See Our Farm and Building Plan Book 



We Want 
Your Trade 






We Give 
Satisfaction 



C. D. HATHAWAY 

Special Agent 



Ellendale, 
North Dakota 



Victor Victrolas Edison Diamond Disc Phonographs 

N. T. HOLTE 

Furniture, Pianos, Sewing Machines 
LICENSED EMBALMER 

Ellendale, N. D. 
Rugs and Lace Curtains Picture Framing 



ED. N. LEIBY 



DRUGS AND DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES, TOILET ARTICLES 
Headquarters for School Books and all Kinds of School Supplies 



Kodaks and Supplies 



PAGE 10" 




■N'1-T'C'H-E'R 




LYNDE BROS. 



THE FORD DEALERS 



Full Line of Accessories and Supplies 



Ellendale, North Dakota 




L. S. JONES 

DRY GOODS, LADIES' AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS 
MILLINERY 

The Store of Good Value 
Ellendale, North Dakota 



PAGE J 08 



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Cf!.~7 



N ITCH ER 




\. W. McDonald, 1 


^resident 


E. J. Williams. 


Secretary 


Ellendale Equity 


Union 






R. A. DILDINE, Manager 







Grain, Fuel and Feed 



Ellendale, North Dakota 



CORNELL'S 



DRY CLEANING, PRESSING AND 
REPAIRING 



Opposite Hotel 



Phone 227 



Sanitary Barber 
Shop 



Where Students Get Up-to-Date 
Service 

A. H. BROWN, Prop. 



C. W. WELCHER 



A. E. DUXPHY 



EBER WELCHER 



The Weldun Company 

Hardware and Supplies 



Ellendale, N. D. 



THOS. BARTA 

SCIENTIFIC HORSE SHOEING 
AND GENERAL BLACKSMITHING 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding and Cutting 

Ellendale, N. D. 



Model Variety Store 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Dry Goods, 

\otions, Confectionery, and 

Stationery 

Corner Opera House Block 

IV m. Heckelsmiller, Prop. 



PAGE 109 




U-i. 



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D. E. GEER 


VADO KERR 


REAL ESTATE AND 


JEWELRY, WATCHES, CLOCKS 


INSURANCE 


SILVERWARE, CI 1 GLASS 




All Repair Work (Guaranteed 


Ellendale, N. D. 


Ellendale, N. 1). 


Join Our Army 


U. G. Shepard 


OF SATISFIED CUSTOMERS 




A Big Chunk of Satisfaction 
With Every Purchase 


REAL ETATE AND 
INSURANCE 


Join Our Army — You'll never regret it 




Hempfling, and Burket 


Ellendale, N. D. 


Report of the 


Condition of 


The Farmers National Bank 


Ellendale, North Dakota, at the c 


lose of business on March 4, 191 8 


RESOURCES 
Loans $169,375.98 


LIABILITIES 
Capital Stock ...$ 25,000.00 


Overdrafts 723.36 

Bonds, Stocks and Securities 30,124.35 

Redemption Fund 312.50 

Stock in Federal Reserve 

Bank 900.00 


Surplus 8,000.00 


Undivided Profits 4,210.87 

Amount Reserved for all in- 
terest accrued 1,000.00 

Circulation 6,250.00 


Banking House, Furniture 

and Fixtures 15,000.00 


Deposits . 256,461.83 




Real Estate 14,570.00 




Cash and due from Banks... 69,916.51 




$300,922.70 


$300,922.70 


McGregor & Hadley 


C. S. Stolp 


The Place to Buy the Best 


CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER 


CIGARS, FRUITS AND CANDIES 




IN THE CITY 


Agent for King Aeriators 


You Are Always Welcome 


Shops north of Salzer Lumber Yards 


McGregor & Hadley 


Ellendale, N. D. 



PAGE 110 




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»r??w^ rwo 



S >J I T C H E R 




(Professional Cards 



F. J. GRAHAM 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Ellendale, N. D. 



DR. HELMA K. RYDELL 

OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN 
Ellendale. N. D. 



DR. L. M. COLEMAN 

DENTIST 

Office in Opera House Block 

Ellendale, N. D. 



DR. GEO. C. KIRCHNER 


T. L. BROUILLARD 


DENTIST 


ATTORNEY AT LAW 


Office over Leiby's Drug Store 


Practice in .-111 Courts 


Ellendale, N. D. 


Ellendale, N. D. 



Brown : "Have you done your outside reading yet?' 
Blumer: "No, it's a little too wet." 



DR. L. R. SANTE 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 

Office over First National Bank 

X-Ray for Diagnosis and Treatment 

Telephone 124 



DR. A. G. MAERCKLEIN 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 

Office over Ellendale National Bank 

Ellendale. N. D. 



C. D. STOUT 

INSURANCE 

(Fire, Lightning, Tornado, Hail) 

Abstracts and Title 

Ellendale, N. D. 



PAGE 111 




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S'NI TCHER 




HOWARD S. DOWNS 

EXPERT REPAIRING IN ALL LINES 
SODA FOUNTAIL IN CONNECTION 

All Work Guaranteed 

Ellendale. N. D. 



JOHN MAARANEN 

Tine Tailor 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing 
and Alterations 

Ellendale, N. D. 



The Lumber Yard that is Different 

No Extras to Pay For 
The Same Price to All 
10 per cent Discount for Cash 
Fall Time Without Interest 
Free Plan Service 
Guaranteed Material Lists 
Signed Sales Tickets 
Individual Building Plans 
Direct from the Mills 

GOOD LUMBER 

Thompson Yards, Inc. 

Ellendale, N. D. 



PAGE 112 




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RANDALL COMPANY 

A Store Where Confidence Dwells Eternal 
THE STUDENTS' SHOPPING HOME 

Where You Get the 
Princess Garments 

Blouse-Craft Waists 
Queen Quality Shoes 
Newest Dress Fabrics 

Butterick Fashions 

FRESHEST GROCERIES 

Gopher and Ft. Snelling Brands White House Coffee 

Try Our Prompt Mail Order Service 
Our Motto Is: Better Today Than Yesterday 



Cleanliness, Promptness and 
Courtesy a Specialty 



The Ellendale 
Cafe 

SHORT ORDERS AT ALL HOURS 

Ice Cream, Candy, Cigars and 
Tobacco 

O. H. Meyers, Proprietor 

Ellendale, N. D. 



The Lyric Theatre 

A place to forget your troubles 
and cares 

ENTERTAINING AND 
EDUCATIONAL 

Complete change of pictures every night 

Two shows every night in the year 
except Sunday 



John Anderson 

Proprietor of 

CITY DRAY AND TRANSFER 
LINE 

Prompt Service 
Ellendale, N. D. 



PAGE 113 




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£l 



S'NITCHER 




Axtell-AmpKlett Dru^Co. 

Nyals and Rexalls Store 

SODA FOUNTAIN AND PHOTO SUPPLIES 
CONFECTIONERY AND TOILET ARTICLES 

Prescriptions- a Specialty 

Ellendale, N. D. 



Condensed Statement 

The First National Bank 

Ellendale, North Dakota, at the close of business March 4, 1918 

RESOURCES LIABILITIES 

Loans and Discounts $383,442.04 Capital Stock $ 25,000.00 

U. S. Bonds . 67.250.00 Surplus 50,000.00 

Stock Fed. Res. Bank 2,250.00 Undivided Profits 8,404.45 

Real Estate - 34,764,38 Circulation 25,000.00 

Cash and due from Banks.... 97,696.58 Deposits 476,998.55 



$585,403.00 $585,403.00 



Ellendale Clothing Company 

MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS FOR EVERY OCCASION 

First Class Shoe Repairing a Specialty 

Ellendale, N. D. 



F. L.WALKER 

FARM MACHINERY AND AUTOMOBILES, WAGONS, BUGGIES AND 
HARNESS, GASOLINE AND OILS 

Ellendale, N. D. 



PAGE 111 




1ST I T CHE R 



#d&°° ^t^^jm^^im 




c Uhe Litts Studio 

Ellendale, N. D. 

PORTRAITS, VIEWS, ENLARGEMENTS, PANORAMA PICTURES 
OIL AND WATER COLOR WORK 

"lour Kodak Pictures Finished in 24 Hours 

We Try to Please You 



i(C Uhe Store of Quality Groceries'' 



Cleanliness 



Quality "HIAWATHA CANNED GOODS" 

"EMPRESS COFFEE" 
"LZARTEAS" 

Good Groceries — Good Service — Good Treatment 

Fred Blumer & Son 



c Uhe Globe-Gazette Printing Co. 

Wahpeton, N. Dak. 
Master Printers :: Booh Makers :: Stationers 




ORK entrusted to us 
is completed with all 
possible speed — con- 
sistent with^ood workmanship 
and tears the stamp o? quality. 
We are justly called "THE 

HOUSE OF SERVICE." 



PAGE Hi 




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r;yr-> > no;. 



S' NITCH ER 




Flannery Bros. 

Quality 
Bread and Cakes 



Ellendale, North Dakota 



Ellendale Creamery Company 

IV m. C. Thompson, Proprietor 

Manufacturers of 
FANCY CREAMERY BUTTER AND ICE CREAM 



Ellendale, N. D. 



P. H. Bjornstad 



H. T. Bjornstad 



P. H. Bjornstad & Son 

HARDWARE, HARNESS AND 
SUPPLIES 



Ellendale, North Dakota 



PAGE llfi 




S' NITCH ER 




Wanda L. Nisse, Proprietor 



B. H. Schuette, Manager 



Waldorf Hotel 

European 



i'lSILI 




11 P 




Electric Lighted, Steam Heated, Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 

Ellendale N. D. 



Youkev & Perry Land Co. 

Ellendale N. D. 

DEALERS IN LAND IN THE FAMOUS ARTESIAN DISTRICT 
OF THE JAMES RIVER VALLEY 



Start Life Right by Buying a Farm 



F. M. Walton 



R. Crowley 



Charles Wahl 



Ellendale Grain and 
Produce Company 

Dealers in 

COAL, WOOD, GRAIN, SEEDS 

AND FEED 

Ellendale N. D. 



PAGE 11 




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Dickey County Leader 

H. J. GODDARD, Ed/for W Publisher 




A Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the Interests of Ellendale and Dicky County 

Established 1882 

The Best Equipped Plant in North Dakota for Printing of the Better Class 

Linotype Composition 

ELLENDALE, NORTH DAKOTA 



c Uhe (Place 
to Buy 

Dry Goods 
Notions 
Pennants 
Stationery 
Books 
Candies 

Fancy China 
Glass Ware 

Enameled Ware 
Garden Seeds 
Tinware 
Toys, Etc. 

(Uhe Fair 

Ellendale, N. I). 



Lacey & Edgerly 

FARM IMPLEMENTS OF ALL 
KINDS 

Gas Engines of All Sizes 
Tractors and Gang Plows 

The Best of Service 

Ellendale, N. D. 



F. M. Kendall 



Ed. Hamar 



Red - White - Blue 
Garage 

Always Open Capacity go Cars 

AUTOMOBILES, TRACTORS 
THRESHERS 

Ellendale, N. D. 



PAGE 118 




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1ST I T C H E R 





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AHN ^OLLIER 

ENGRAVING COMPAnZ^ 



jS/esyners and ihgnzrers 

of ffig/iesf Qz/a/i/y 
-ANNUALS /SE~ 

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/V/aienr of- 
/ Illustrations. Designs 

:?#^p# Photographs ° 

.r;,^-^^ •'■" Halftones, Line md 

T/-"- : - y ' :: " BenDaV Zinc Etchings 

Three ™* Four Color ° 
Process Plates - 

ha 'Blast Quality 

ytfairt OrY/ce and Plan! crt s~> r r t s-* a /~* /~\Jttlanta - Davenport-Kansas Gfu 
354- W. Adorns Street ^4 K^XAlV^, fWj \J Milwaukee-South Bend-Toledo 



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